• New user questions about Antergos


    I will be installing this on a old Thinkpad. I tried out the live iso and things look good. I’m going to wipe out Windows and this will be the only OS.

    • should I choose separate partitions for / and /home? If so is 20GB ok or too low/high for /? I’m planning to use this as my daily pc and also do web development. No gaming.
    • For /home, is is preferable to choose xfs? I read about this somewhere
    • I will be using KDE. Does the installer get the latest versions?
    • with 8GB ram I don’t need swap right? My disk space is limited
    • how often does Antergos update? I’ve read that with Arch there are very frequent updates some of which can render the systen unusable and users should read the arch announcements list.
    • is there a recommended system optimization guide or should I read Arch wiki?

    thanks

  • @defc

    Hi defc,

    A seperate / and /home is really just personal preference. Whatever you chose is fine. A 20 GB partition for a seperate / partition is plenty, if not even a little overkill. But, always better more than not enough.

    Pick whatever filesystem you like. It’s hard to beat ext4 overall.

    No matter what DE you chose, you’ll likely get the most recent version as long as it’s not still in Arch unstable, which is usually a relatively short period of time.

    You should be fine without a swap. That’s plenty of RAM. If you have a SSD, I’d recommend no swap.

    With the exception of one basic Antergos repo, everything is directly from Arch. Updates are every couple of days or so. Yes, check the Antergos forum and Arch forum when updates are of seeming major cogs of the OS. Otherwise, you’re good to go. Yes, there can be minor glitches every so often, but would be fairly rare. Remember, Ubuntu follows an unstable branch. My experiences prove Antergos to be as stable as Ubuntu, or better.

    There’s all kinds of guides around. This forum is a good place…ask away! Arch wiki is a gem. Antergos is pretty lean & mean OOTB. Other than using something like systemd-manager to manage what startup processes you really need to start at boot, it’s pretty good to go as is.

    One word of caution…once you wipe Windows, just remember the consequences…you’ll never go back. 🎰

  • @greenmartian said in New user questions about Antergos:

    One word of caution…once you wipe Windows, just remember the consequences…you’ll never go back.

    I would say you never want to go back again, and this can be also a challange 😉

    20GB for root / will be a good go… if you have the extra 20GB for /home of cause!

    Having a seperate /home partion is to your benefit, if you need to reinstall in case of a hard system issue… you can keep home and reinstall, without the huzzle to copy all personal data away before…

    I know there some users using xfs as filesystem, but i would not recommend this, the standard used is ext4, and the speed + is not that big that i would say xfs is better…

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    how to add system logs:
    wget http://bit.ly/2GCG9k2 && sh 2GCG9k2
    help development: donate antergos

  • @defc Hi defc, I have been using antergos for about 4 weeks now and I have it to be more sound then ubuntu. I will never go back.

  • @defc
    I have a separate partition for root, originally set to 60 GB, but it’s using 35GB, having a lot of things installed and running for more than a year. I’m not cleaning pacman cache and didn’t reduce my journal system to use less space.

    I’d say 30GB for root is more than enough. I think 20GB may not be enough for root.

    So the easier would be to use everything in one partition than using a separate root that won’t have enough space disk in the furure forcing you to reinstall the system just to add a bigger root partition. (just my 2 cents)

    Portergos site
    https://github.com/Portergos/portergos-iso

    Still in love with Antergos (default OS)
    I3wm

    Linux newbie since 06/2016

  • @defc may you give us the size of your HD so we can give you advice 😉

    @fernandomaroto i have allways set root to 35GB but never use more then 20GB… actual it is only 17GB.
    But i do system cleanups every week 😉

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    how to add system logs:
    wget http://bit.ly/2GCG9k2 && sh 2GCG9k2
    help development: donate antergos

  • @joekamprad said in New user questions about Antergos:

    @fernandomaroto i have allways set root to 35GB but never use more then 20GB… actual it is only 17GB.
    But i do system cleanups every week

    0_1525783329990_download.png

    Portergos site
    https://github.com/Portergos/portergos-iso

    Still in love with Antergos (default OS)
    I3wm

    Linux newbie since 06/2016

  • @fernandomaroto wau! 9,2 GB !

     [email protected] ~ du -h /var/cache/pacman/pkg
    918M	/var/cache/pacman/pkg
    
    

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    how to add system logs:
    wget http://bit.ly/2GCG9k2 && sh 2GCG9k2
    help development: donate antergos

  • So if it happens that the packages in cache will never be removed , it will fill up till infinity?

    /var/cache/pacman/pkg
    

    I do not see something inside pacman.conf that cleans it up automatic… and itis indeed true:

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/pacman#Cleaning_the_package_cache

    and does not remove the old or uninstalled versions automatically. Therefore, it is necessary to deliberately clean up that folder periodically to prevent such folder to grow indefinitely in size.

    I do nbot remeber this … but good then to do cleanups some times… would ber a candidate for a systemd service to remove packages older the half a infinity…

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    how to add system logs:
    wget http://bit.ly/2GCG9k2 && sh 2GCG9k2
    help development: donate antergos

  • //offtopic end//

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    how to add system logs:
    wget http://bit.ly/2GCG9k2 && sh 2GCG9k2
    help development: donate antergos

  • @joekamprad said in New user questions about Antergos:

    So if it happens that the packages in cache will never be removed , it will fill up till infinity?

    /var/cache/pacman/pkg
    

    I do not see something inside pacman.conf that cleans it up automatic… and itis indeed true:

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/pacman#Cleaning_the_package_cache

    and does not remove the old or uninstalled versions automatically. Therefore, it is necessary to deliberately clean up that folder periodically to prevent such folder to grow indefinitely in size.

    I do nbot remeber this … but good then to do cleanups some times… would ber a candidate for a systemd service to remove packages older the half a infinity…

    I don’t remember for how long i don’t clean cache, but i guess not more than a year, so the system fills up pretty fast.

    Trying to do some math here:
    I started using Antergos near september 2016, so after some reinstalls and cleaning cache (less than 2 years i have 10GB of pacman cache).

    But to get back to topic here i’d recommend 25GB of root partition then, considering i’d have this space needed if i cleaned my system.

    Portergos site
    https://github.com/Portergos/portergos-iso

    Still in love with Antergos (default OS)
    I3wm

    Linux newbie since 06/2016

  • Thanks for all the replies. Sorry I didn’t mention the total size of disk.

    The pc is an old Thinkpad I bought specifically for Linux. It came with 4GB ram and a hdd, I replaced ram to 8GB and hdd with 128GB ssd. So I have 20GB root, ~108GB /home, no swap.

    I was able to install Antergos successfully and system is running fine. In the installer I chose manual partitioning after wiping the disk with -

    512MB fat32 /boot/efi
    20GB ext4 /
    108GB xfs /home

    I installed yay as AUR helper as it seemed to have lot of positive things.

    About the package cleanup, is it done by ‘yay -c’ or do I need to cleanup that folder myself? What is a ‘system cleanup’?

    I have used Ubuntu in the past and still like it but I got tired of different ways to install programs - add ppa, binary etc plus I have heard so many good things about Arch, then a little research led me to Antergos and here I am.

    I have not done any optimization yet, what do you recommend for my system - e.g. in the Arch wiki I see many things about using alternative kernel, IO schedulers etc.

    Some more things -

    • when I start the system, I see the welcome box with time. Then you press enter to login and then Plasma loads. Is there a way to speed this up, e.g. in the installer there was option to login automatically which I believe I checked but still see this.

    • any guides for configuring KDE? I saw a few videos and theres a lot to learn

    • my system is now up and running so I don’t think I should redo the install and this time choose ext4 for /home, but I can if its better. @fernandomaroto said 20GB isn’t enough so should I change that, or just skip separate partitions?

    • how do I migrate all settings (including my desktop etc) to another pc. I see some dotfiles like .config, .kde, so if I just copy these into new install its enough?

    • I haven’t yet installed tlp or powertop so that’s next, hope I get same battery life as Windows.

  • @defc
    One thing that nobody seemed to mention: backups.
    The most important thing to organize after install is backups and making them regularly.
    And I mean backups of your own data, not really the system.

    If your backups are in good order, then it really doesn’t matter how you partition the disk, as long as the system works properly.

    I’d recommend against using a separate /home partition, because you may later need to resize partitions, and that may be challenging, particularly if any partition is rather full.

    And ext4 is a very good and stable file system, I wouldn’t use xfs.
    For example, phoronix.com have tested various file systems from time to time, and I don’t remember seeing any real benefits for xfs over ext4.

    Xfce is my favorite DE. Years ago I liked KDE, but not so much anymore because it has become much heavier over the years. Xfce is light and versatile enough for me.

    As already said here, many of the choices here are a matter of personal taste. But backups are not, since without them life can very suddenly be much more difficult than before.

    A tool for sending logs: https://forum.antergos.com/topic/10586/eat-logs
    Install eat: wget -q https://github.com/manuel-192/eat/raw/master/PKGBUILD && makepkg -sic

  • @manuel I agree about backups. I do so in Windows using file copying manually, in Linux I’d like to start using rsync or hopefully some nice UI on top that can do incremental backups.

    I like KDE because its almost as light as XFCE and has so much more. Gnome is so slow and bloated, it used almost 2x the resources and has far less features I have no idea why its the default.

    Is there something in Linux that will allow me to take full image backups then restore my system using a live cd if things went wrong?

  • @defc
    I’ve organized my data backups with Unison and used it for a long time. It is much like rsync (or grsync), but has an easy GUI and can copy changed files to “both” directions (master <-> copy) if you wish. It makes an exact copy of each specified directory tree.

    I think clonezilla is a good choice for image backups. Must admit I usually don’t use it, but have have used it on some occasions successfully.

    Both of those programs are readily available in the repos.

    A tool for sending logs: https://forum.antergos.com/topic/10586/eat-logs
    Install eat: wget -q https://github.com/manuel-192/eat/raw/master/PKGBUILD && makepkg -sic

  • About the package cleanup, is it done by ‘yay -c’ or do I need to cleanup that folder myself? What is a ‘system cleanup’?

    Hi!
    I have never heard/read about yay -c. Cleaning package cache is done with sudo pacman -Scc i don’t do it and don’t recommend it because i like to have old packages in the system in case of some update going wrong, then i can quikly downgrade the package directly from my cache, instead of the need of downloading it from “Arch linux Archive”

    I have used Ubuntu in the past and still like it but I got tired of different ways to install programs

    Yes Arch/Antergos is much simpler, you can use a GUI tool called pamac o search both official and AUR packages. (AUR is asort of PPA’s collection, much simpler and faster to install unofficial stuff)

    I have not done any optimization yet, what do you recommend for my system - e.g. in the Arch wiki I see many things about using alternative kernel, IO schedulers etc.

    I don’t think you’ll need those thing right now, but i recommend you to have LTS kernel installed too, it’s handy to have another kernel in case something goes wrong.

    in the installer there was option to login automatically which I believe I checked but still see this.

    I don’t use lightdm but i’m pretty sure that’s easy to fix, try searching in our forum or even the internet to check how to configurate it.

    any guides for configuring KDE? I saw a few videos and theres a lot to learn

    Probably a youtube search is a good choice.

    my system is now up and running so I don’t think I should redo the install and this time choose ext4 for /home, but I can if its better. @fernandomaroto said 20GB isn’t enough so should I change that, or just skip separate partitions?

    Don’t need to reinstall unless you want to practice something. I’ve never used another linux partition format than ext4, and it never failed me though.

    how do I migrate all settings (including my desktop etc) to another pc. I see some dotfiles like .config, .kde, so if I just copy these into new install its enough?

    That’s tricky, you’re on the way, usually config files are at your home folder under .config .local or the package name itself. Also you may want to move config files from system like /etc folder in case you changed them.

    Portergos site
    https://github.com/Portergos/portergos-iso

    Still in love with Antergos (default OS)
    I3wm

    Linux newbie since 06/2016

  • When it comes to configuring KDE Plasma, I recommend BigDaddyLinux’s videos.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbKR0OXmf-fg-olEJLukx6ytKN2CkVDjZ

    They cover most subjects thoroughly, and there are a more than a few, so buclke up, and grab some popcorn as there are a couple of hours to watch.

  • @mrecks

    Yes, of Rocco & gang giggling like school children. 👱🏻 👱🏽 👱🏾♂ 👴

    Just kidding, kind of…they do a very nice job on their videos.

    GM

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