• comparison


    is antergos same as arch linux or are there some differences?

  • Hi there!

    Antergos is a lot like Arch, but there are differences. Here are some of them in random order (someone please correct me if I’m wrong or something important is missing):

    • Antergos has a GUI installer (cnchi) that helps you install a full desktop (and also without a desktop!)
    • Antergos has GUI package managers, pamac and octopi, in addition to pacman from Arch
    • Antergos has an own repository in addition to Arch repos, providing more officially supported packages
    • Antergos has AUR, too (AUR = packages managed by users)
    • Antergos has an own wiki and forums
    • Antergos community is very friendly and not at all elitistic :)

    Note also that Arch wiki and forums provide a lot of useful information for Antergos users.

  • @drishalballaney said in comparison:

    is antergos same as arch linux or are there some differences?

    It depends on a point of view.

    A most common answer is no, there are no differences. It’s the case for 99% of users.

    A less obvious answer is yes, there are significant differences, which make Antergos very different from Arch.

  • From the noob point of view the difference is vast. An Arch Linux install involves locking yourself in during a massive cold for a week, watching Arch Install-videos, reading a lot of manuals and how to’s, trying and failing the set up you’ve chosen a few times in a VirtualBox before getting it right, and doing it on an actual machine. VS. Reading the manual, using Etcher for the ISO, plugging it in, running the installer, making a few selections during install, and after ten minutes having a running computer.

    If you love coding and have lot of time to put aside for it chose Arch, as it gives you absolute control over your system.

    If you need a working system with most of the benefits of an Arch install up and running, and can set aside the absolute control-part, chose Antergos.

    My guess is that an experienced user could do the Arch set up as fast as Antergos does, but I’m very much not here yet myself.

  • @just said in comparison:

    A less obvious answer is yes, there are significant differences, which make Antergos very different from Arch.

    @mrecks said in comparison:

    From the noob point of view the difference is vast. An Arch Linux install involves locking yourself in during a massive cold for a week, watching Arch Install-videos, reading a lot of manuals and how to’s, trying and failing the set up you’ve chosen a few times in a VirtualBox before getting it right, and doing it on an actual machine. VS. Reading the manual, using Etcher for the ISO, plugging it in, running the installer, making a few selections during install, and after ten minutes having a running computer.

    If you love coding and have lot of time to put aside for it chose Arch, as it gives you absolute control over your system.

    If you need a working system with most of the benefits of an Arch install up and running, and can set aside the absolute control-part, chose Antergos.

    My guess is that an experienced user could do the Arch set up as fast as Antergos does, but I’m very much not here yet myself.

    @joekamprad said in comparison:

    is-antergos-an-installer-for-archlinux?

    Dad = Arch
    Son of blood = Antergos

    Why?

    With any of the two distros, you can solve problems, be always with the latest updated software and above all in what refers to the security of the systems, it is very good (within what is lived today and understood by “being insurance”…)

    For the rest, the choice is personal.

    I agree with you, Arch is not the same as Antergos.
    It would be like arguing with which you stay between a Lambo, a Ferrari or a Pagani.

    It is also indisputable the good vibes that there around here, I mean?

  • @judd said in comparison:

    It is also indisputable the good vibes that there around here, I mean?

    and in my brain this is the main difference ;)
    As at Archdad they like to talk at a certain level of knowledge, here at Antergos we do not. We welcome you on every level of knowledge.

  • A very good question! :)

  • Well it is more Arch than say, Manjaro, in that all the packages availble for arch, plus the AUR are there, but, Antergos has their own repo to boot. Cinchi and pacmac are very convienient, while not being in the say. You can still do advanced installs on antergos using the arch wiki for things like LVM2 and the like. Just take partitioning into your own hands. I used gparted for my pv’s and then used the LVM article from the arch wiki for my set up.it took me a lot less time on my laptop than my desktop as I installed antergos on logical volumes I originally created for arch. I ran arch for six months before switching back. I just liked the looks since the default numix themes are not availible for other versions of linux and I liked them. I still use the terminal for using reflector, or to mess with gpg keys for AUR builds, and other things like that, but, pacmac is as good a GUI installer as any on modern linux distros, and, it isn’t too cluttered. Very intuitive.

  • @michaelnothing said in comparison:

    Cinchi and pacmac are very convienient,…

    Just out of curiousity - what is “pacmac”?

  • @just A good guess is “pacmac” is supposed to be “pamac”. 😉

  • @mrecks 😜 good catch.

  • If you ask on the Arch forums or dare to mention to one of the hardcore Arch users, even changing one byte of text in official Arch distro makes it ‘not Arch’ and they will absolutely refuse to help you or even listen to you. I’ve seen experienced users post who use their own scripts to install Arch, to save time, and they are shunned. Its a ridiculous attitude.

    As far as I’m concerned for all intents and purposes, Antergos=Arch. If someone is willing to debate the semantics then there’s no point arguing with them. You can do the manual install if you are very careful and read a lot and are willing to try it a few times. Or you can run cnchi. In the end you’ll end up with the exact same thing. There is so much to learn in Linux and enjoy without having to do it all by hand.

    btw I didn’t know Antergos came with Octopi. I installed the KDE desktop and I only see pamac.

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