• Text only installation, installing DE afterwards


    I was thinking about trying to learn a bit more here; I am basically a Linux Noob, coming back to it after a short test run in it back when Linux Mint was brand new (so that’s a while ago).
    Installed Antergos KDE a week ago and it more or less works fine (my only real problem is that the driver package for my printer is broken, so I have to save files to PDF then print them out using a stick from my Windows.

    However, it seems I am bouncing off KDE, just like last time. Last time i jumped into it, loving it for a few days then realizing there was too much that bothered me. Not trying to start a flame war or anything but I was thinking of going either Gnome or Cinnamon, do a new clean install and thne thought… Hey why not go a little bit longer just to learn a little bit more?

    SO:

    1. It seems internet drivers are functioning in text only due to well the fine job done by the Antegros team? Makes things easier.
    2. If I install a “pure” installation of Gnome or Cinnamon, how much will follow? Icon themes etc?
    3. Will the graphical package manager be installed or easily installable?
  • @snailbeard said in Text only installation, installing DE afterwards:

    If I install a “pure” installation of Gnome or Cinnamon

    what do you want say here? You want a fresh install without any DE? and then install GNOME or Cinnamon by hand from CLI/TTY?

    If you want to why not… but to get system work you will need to configure from scratch to then, not only theming also DM (Loginmanager) and basic services like network-manager to get network configs working inside DE later… cups… avahi-daemon … …

    This is basicly like installing pure Archlinux.

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    antergos:_rescue
    how to add system logs:
    wget http://bit.ly/2GCG9k2 && sh 2GCG9k2
    :handshake: donate antergos

  • @joekamprad That’s what I was thinking about. Unfortunately there’s only one (1) video on Youtube where someone chooses to do the “console only” install (to put i3 on there, which was not supported at the time, it seems).

    My question, really, was “how much IS actually installed on the console only version”?

    From that video I can see (and he comments on it) that the installer does put in for example about 10 fonts even though he picked the “no GE option”. It also seemed to have functioning Wireless network installed by default, he never had to activate it.

  • as far as i know it take wireless credintials from installation, but for later use at a Desktop Environment you may want to have a graphical configuration for it…

    So you can boot up and use pacman to install packages… and do console configurations…

    steps would be like this:

    • install packages for DE by choosing package groups from ArchLinux and pamac (software center)
      sudo pacman -S gnome gnome-extra pamac

    https://www.archlinux.org/groups/x86_64/gnome/

    https://www.archlinux.org/groups/x86_64/gnome-extra/

    or you can choose the meta packages from antergos repo:

    sudo pacman -S antergos-gnome-meta antergos-midnight-timers

    Then enable DM to get a graphical login for DE:

    sudo systemctl enable gdm

    or if you want the default Antergos login:

    sudo pacman -S lightdm lightdm-webkit2-greeter light-locker
    sudo systemctl enable lightdm

    reboot … done …

    (This is Antergos simple)

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    antergos:_rescue
    how to add system logs:
    wget http://bit.ly/2GCG9k2 && sh 2GCG9k2
    :handshake: donate antergos

  • @joekamprad Thank you!
    Wife flying off to Los Angeles tomorrow, so I can start this then.

  • @snailbeard
    One thing that might help you decide what to do eventually: install VirtualBox and then install Antergos as a virtual machine under the control of VirtualBox.

    This enables you to easily experiment with various desktops and even the desktopless install. Note however it is not the same as installing as native to the hardware, but anyway lets you see what they are like.

    One catch though, virtual machines need RAM, and you should have at least 8GB of RAM to run virtual machines smoothly. And you need to have enough disk space for the virtual machine (about 10GB ?). You can reuse the same disk space if you want to e.g. reinstall another desktop to the machine from scratch.

    A tool for sending logs: https://forum.antergos.com/topic/10586/eat-logs
    Install eat: wget -q https://github.com/manuel-192/eat/raw/master/PKGBUILD && makepkg -sic

  • @manuel Thank you. I’d do that, I think. Been trying few live distros and i guess it’s a sign that Microsoft has done something right with 10; All the ones I have tried has felt lacking in some way. Cinnamon and Budgie really just feel like clunky versions of Windows XP with uglier icons, Plasma is theoretically great but SOO customizable and yet no real good looks or harmony in design (though it is TONS better than KDE 3 or 4, who just looked like 5 ppl who never talked to each other each created something cool, and then they glued it together afterwards), Gnome is well… Your average Android phone on a 17 inch screen for some reason, XFCE is basically Windows 98…

    I’ll go on hunting. i keep returning to Gnome and Plasma though.

  • @snailbeard
    Great that you could test them. VirtualBox doesn’t present an operating system at its best, but lets you make some simple testing.

    I’m using Xfce as my daily driver. It is not that pretty but gets the work done very well. And looks much better with only few minor customizations.

    For me KDE seems too heavy, and Gnome quite restricted (although you may use extensions, but some of them seem to have issues).

    MATE is also worth checking, although personally I prefer Xfce.

    A tool for sending logs: https://forum.antergos.com/topic/10586/eat-logs
    Install eat: wget -q https://github.com/manuel-192/eat/raw/master/PKGBUILD && makepkg -sic

  • @manuel Well I was thinking about MATE, but it looks like it was a fork of Gnome 2 (which it is) which is to say… dated. More so than XFCE, actually.

    What has surprised me most is that Plasma actually is less resource heavy than both Gnome 3 but also Cinnamon (well it’s based on Gnome so not THAT surprising).

    I am not that sensitive to resource-heaviness because yes my laptop is 4 years old almost but it was top of the line then with i7, a decent nvidia card and 8gb of ram.
    Basically Gnome 3 and Plasma 5 both bounces around like a 4 year old on coffee in it and boots at 1/3d of the time compared to Windows.

    I’ll check out XFCE also.

  • @manuel said in Text only installation, installing DE afterwards:

    MATE is also worth checking, although personally I prefer Xfce.

    Lately, having nothing better to do, I tried several DEs, in search of an alternative to my favourite GNOME, which could be used on older machines. Most of them gave me same or hardly any better performance than GNOME did. MATE performed not bad, but I couldn’t get used to its ancient user interface. If I really had to choose another desktop, it would be XFCE, which gives the best performance, and offers quite a lot of possibilities of customization.

    0_1524516888918_gnome_vs_xfce.png

    Take a look at my portfolio

  • @piotr said in Text only installation, installing DE afterwards:

    @manuel said in Text only installation, installing DE afterwards:

    MATE is also worth checking, although personally I prefer Xfce.

    Lately, having nothing better to do, I tried several DEs, in search of an alternative to my favourite GNOME, which could be used on older machines. Most of them gave me same or hardly any better performance than GNOME did. MATE performed not bad, but I couldn’t get used to its ancient user interface. If I really had to choose another desktop, it would be XFCE, which gives the best performance, and offers quite a lot of possibilities of customization.

    0_1524516888918_gnome_vs_xfce.png

    Looking at that desktop I think I have figured out my biggest, and yet smallest, problem with Plasma (AND Gnome-based):
    There are no good looking icons. Seriously.
    The Windows 10 icons are boring, but matches the rest of the GUI. Linux? Not so much. The default icons are dated, and 99% of the “beautiful ones” that everyone recommends are not to my liking at all. Why is the current trend is “Icons designed for 5 year olds”. Seriously, all the popular icon themes are extremely colorful (good), flat (good) but also very very childish in design. They are phone icons, plain and simple. On a desktoo I expect the Numix Square to be used in say a math game for 1st graders, not in a desktop environment for adults. But again, the alternatives are either incomplete, abandoned, or ugly.
    It is even worse in Plasma, where it is all very sleek and shiny… Except the icons. I’d even go so far that not a single icon set on the net actually fits the look and feel of the Plasma desktop. Including the default ones.

    Seriously, this is a ridiculous thing to be annoyed by, but I just can’t stand ANY of the popular icon sets. In any DE or distro. I mean seeing your great looking desktop above… And then the icons, which IMHO just doesn’t work with that theme. At all. This is, I realize now, my main reason to wanting to leave Plasma. I have spent a week trying to customize it to my liking, and at least 12 hours have just been downloading and testing icon sets, only to realize they look absolutely horribly jarringly stupid against ANY desktop background except a plain single color one with no picture on it.
    A cool car? Not working with the happy colorful baby design icons. Same with a stylish artistic background. Or a single cloud in the sky.

    Basically what I am looking for is n icon set that matches the design of the DE it’s for.
    (whixh is another issue with Plasma, 99,5% of all icons are designed for Gnome).

    Oh well, I’ll get past that eventually 🙂 Sorry for ranting.
    I like GNOME 3 much better after I figured out how to half or even 1/3rd the size of the icons.

  • @snailbeard Well, I change wallpapers (searching on the web or drawing myself, like this one) quite often, when I have no real work to do. However, since I’ve found numix-circle icons, which are the best readable to me, I keep on using them. I don’t care if they match the rest, since recognition at a glance is what I expect. And, to be honest: I’ve finished my latest project in February, and have no idea on a new one. The fact that I started carrying what my desktop looks like means, that I need a new challenge urgently. 😉

    Take a look at my portfolio

installation279 installing106 text13 afterwards1 Posts 12Views 386
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