• Partition Table


    Can someone please confirm that my partitions are set up correctly?

    https://imgur.com/a/ZHpIC

    (Sorry for the pictures, I am currently unable to install anything from the repos on the live USB and can’t get a decent picture-taking tool)

  • Looks like you are breaking up an SSD drive that had an existing factory Windows install?

    It looks like you have your bases covered. You have a /boot/efi, swap and a / covered. The Windows partitions are not as “clean” as I prefer, but that can’t be helped with a factory install. Looks like it should work.

  • @Palanthis said in Partition Table:

    Looks like you are breaking up an SSD drive that had an existing factory Windows install?

    Yup.

    @Palanthis said in Partition Table:

    It looks like you have your bases covered. You have a /boot/efi, swap and a / covered. The Windows partitions are not as “clean” as I prefer, but that can’t be helped with a factory install. Looks like it should work.

    I actually had to fix it since I noticed I was making a new EFI partition. I don’t know if mounting the already existing ESP partition to /boot/efi is valid.

    0_1511978770436_e6b8669c-0f8f-4b51-a929-76c666979020-image.png
    Fixed partition table

  • That looks even better. I personally prefer a larger boot partition since I usually run multiple kernels, but that should work.

    Also, *note, GRUB may not correctly see the Windows install when you first set everything up. There is a very quick way to fix it, though.

  • Arch wiki said standard size is 512 MB, but I’ll probably use less, are you sure that mounting it like this won’t create problems?

    If I remember correctly, just doing sudo os-prober should let GRUB see my Windows installation.

  • To be fair, I can’t be sure. XD I’ve never seen your computer. I can only be fairly certain that I don’t see any issues, which I don’t. That being said. If this is a Windows install that has stuff you care about, please make sure you have good backups. Even veteran users can’t always predict what is going to happen on an install, especially dual-boot.

    All of that out of the way, I don’t see any issues. And I’ve never seen install issues that the community can’t sort out after some back and forth on the forums.

  • I opened the computer four hours ago, so there isn’t anything important on it. I can risk not backing it up. Thank you so much for your help, I will now continue the installation process and report back whether or not it succeeded.

  • Awesome! And it’s my/our pleasure. Antergos has the best community I’ve ever encountered. We love helping out. :)

    I’ll keep checking for updates, since I am “invested” now. I will also find the exact commands for fixing GRUB, if it misses the Windows install. We just ran through it the other day. Just running os-prober wasn’t enough for me, I had to follow it up with a grub-mkconfig, but I want to be sure of the exact options we had to use.

  • This was the thread.

    1. Install os-prober (probably already installed)
    2. Mount your Windows parition inside of Linux
    3. Run os-prober sudo os-prober
    4. Run grub-mkconfig sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg
    5. Reboot
  • @Palanthis Sorry for the delay, it took some time to install.

    Antergos installed, but sudo os-prober yields me this error message:

    /dev/[email protected]/EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi:Windows Boot Manager:Windows:efi
    grub-probe: error: cannot find a GRUB drive for /dev/sdb1.  Check your device.map.
    
  • Okay. Researching. Did you try the grub-mkconfig after that, just to see what it says?

  • Generating grub configuration file ...
    Found theme: /boot/grub/themes/Antergos-Default/theme.txt
    Found Intel Microcode image
    Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-linux
    Found initrd image: /boot/initramfs-linux.img
    Found fallback initramfs image: /boot/initramfs-linux-fallback.img
    Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-linux-lts
    Found initrd image: /boot/initramfs-linux-lts.img
    Found fallback initramfs image: /boot/initramfs-linux-lts-fallback.img
    grub-probe: error: cannot find a GRUB drive for /dev/sdb1.  Check your device.map.
    Found Windows Boot Manager on /dev/[email protected]/EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi
    done
    
  • Okay. I am doing some reading. Have you tried rebooting to see if Windows is in the GRUB menu at startup? From what I am reading, it shouldn’t care about the device map anymore, as it should be using UUIDs.

  • I managed to pin it down to still recognizing the USB stick I had plugged in during startup. I used eject to get rid of it.

    On that note, I have chosen XFCE for my DE (having liked GNOME but wanting something more customizable) but alas I find it a bit hard to use. Would you say KDE is more or less resource-heavy than GNOME?

    EDIT: And, lastly, before I go to sleep, should I follow the Arch Wiki’s instructions on using swap on an SSD (i.e. adding defaults,discard in fstab in the swap line)?

  • KDE is more resource heavy than GNOME. However, I absolutely love XFCE. I have 5 Linux boxes and they all run XFCE. A couple of tweaks, themes, some custom panel plugins and fonts and it is a beautiful DE.

    alt text

  • @Noammac I’d have to read on that. I don’t make any tweaks in fstab, as it generally already has all of the correct settings for an SSD. Also, I have never seen my system (32GB of RAM) need to swap anything.

  • Problem is, you’re using a panel while I fancy docks. In GNOME we had dynamic spaces and things of the sort, but here I find it impossible to set the clock in the top panel to always be in the middle, or ensure the small panel XFCE calls a dock is locked to the middle (and changes length when icons are added while still staying centered), etc. I guess this is late at night and I might be more willing to delve into the deeper options of XFCE tomorrow, but I’m finding it increasingly difficult to migrate the setup from my previous machine (how do you set a different monospace and interface font?).

    I have 8GBs of RAM and am afraid that a swap partition would degrade my SSD as countless people have told me it would, so I’m trying to solve this problem (assuming it even exists).

  • You can’t see it in my screenshot, but I use Cairodock. Looks great, works great. I will research the swap issue and should have more info for you tomorrow. I will also write up a more detailed tweaking guide for XFCE.

  • Thank you very much, I didn’t expect the community to be this friendly.

  • Tweaking Guide - as promised.

    XFCE Tweaking Guide

    For starters, I recommend that you install XFCE4 Goodies. This contains a lot of additional features and plugins for panels.
    sudo pacman -S xfce4-goodies

    Panels
    To move any panel, right click on it and select “Panel”, “Panel Preferences”
    Un-check “Lock Panel”. You can now grab the panel by either edge and move it anywhere. You can also change the orientation, length, etc.

    Items
    From the items tab, you can add, remove and configure plugins on your panels. I recommend at the least that you change the default Applications menu out for Whisker Menu, which is a far more robust option. There are many more plugins, which you should check out. To configure a specific plugin, just right-click on it and select “properties”. I change my Whisker Menu icon and set custom text. I set a custom date format for the clock, add weather, pulse audio, system monitor and screen shot tool.

    Theme
    I usually install the Arc and Adapta themes. To change your theme, click on Whisker Menu and type in Appearance. Both of these themes have nice dark options. Also go to Window Manager and change the theme here to ensure that your window bars match your system theme. You can also set the font for window bars here.

    GTK Theme
    Some apps are written in GTK and will use a different default appearance setting. To control this, I typically install qt5-gsettings-git. Once installed, this will allow you to set your QT theme to gtk2, which will mimic your default system theme. You can (should) also change your default font for QT apps.

    Fonts
    I love the Google Noto fonts. They are crisp and clean and include standard and monospace fonts. They are available in the standard repositories (noto-fonts). You can set these as your default font options from within Appearance (Fonts Tab), Window Manager, and QT5 Settings. Some plugins also have font control, such as Weather.

    Additional
    I always install Cairo-Dock, which is available in the official repositories. You can change its appearance, position and much more. In XFCE, it will cause a small anomaly with a strange distorted band on your screen. This is easily fixed. Whisker Menu, Window Manager Tweaks, Compositor tab, un-check “Show shadows under dock windows”.

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