• Antergos boot with other Lx?


    What is it with arch-based systems that they don’t play well with others? In the past i used Manjaro, but for some time have preferred Antergos as my main OS. I do like to install and have a look at others on a secondary laptop. Just now i have 3 non-arch linux OSs existing together and behaving properly. The last one installed simply uses it’s version of grub and adds the others. If i try the same config with Manjaro or Antergos, installing first, the next os feletes it from the grub choices. If i install the arch-based os last, it almost always doesn’t include other oss iin the grub boot menu?

  • @billd

    Grub (or more specifically, os-prober) has sometimes problems when trying to guess which operating systems are installed to a machine. But I assume you are not really referring to that.

    After installing another operating system, you should run either

    update-grub    # in Debian/Ubuntu/etc.
    

    or

    grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg    # in Arch/Antergos/Manjaro
    

    in the system that you want to be in charge of the boot process and find other operating systems. Both commands above use os-prober (actually update-grub is just a script to run grub-mkconfig with those parameters).

    But there are other ways to create a boot menu that do not rely on (buggy) os-prober.

    In order to change the system that controls the boot, you can use command grub-install.

    I’d recommend installing Arch/Antergos/Manjaro last, because Debian/Ubuntu/Mint/etc. do not handle booting of Arch-based systems properly.

  • This is very interesting about Grub and excellently explained

    # Here is an example of a fairly generic /boot/grub/grub.cfg supporting
    # booting across partitions and devices.
    
    # Most modules are automatically loaded from /boot/grub/<target>/ but
    # if the the kernels or loaders are on a different filesystem you should
    # use insmod to tell grub which it is.
    
    # Read `info grub' for more details.
    
    set timeout=1
    set default=0
    
    # If using UEFI enable the Graphics Output Protocol (GOP).
    insmod efi_gop
    
    # Replace UUIDs below with the actual UUID of the filesystem which contains
    # kernels or loaders.
    
    menuentry "Linux" {
        search -u UUID
        linux  /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=UUID=$root rw
        initrd /boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-linux.img
    }
    
    # A simple LVM example.
    menuentry "Linux on LVM" {
        set root=(lvm/vg-boot)
        linux  /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/mapper/vg-root rw
        initrd /boot/intel-ucode.img /boot/initramfs-linux.img
    }
    
    # The ntldr command can load Windows directly on BIOS systems.
    menuentry "Windows XP" {
        insmod ntfs
        search -u UUID
        ntldr /ntldr
    }
    
    # On UEFI you will have to use the chainloader.
    menuentry "Windows 7 to 10" {
        insmod ntfs
        insmod chain
        search -u UUID
        chainloader /EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi
    }
    

    Source: Eschwartz

  • @judd
    Very interesting info! :)

    But the link: “You do not have permission to access this page.”

  • @manuel said in Antergos boot with other Lx?:

    But the link: “You do not have permission to access this page.”

    linux=linux
    linux=freedom

    Do not you think ???

    On the other hand I’m putting the source, from then on, we’ll see …

  • @judd
    Sorry I was vague. The first link worked well. The second (in the end) gave the message.
    Edit: fixed typo.

  • @manuel !

    Nothing to apologize, at all!

  • @judd
    I think the best way to use the excellent grub.cfg (with local modifications naturally) you wrote above is to put it to a file named /boot/grub/custom.cfg instead of /boot/grub/grub.cfg.

    That way one can experiment with it without fear of messing up the boot process. And you don’t need to remember to run grub-mkconfig at all.

  • @manuel said in Antergos boot with other Lx?:

    you wrote above is to put it to a file named /boot/grub/custom.cfg

    And you don’t need to remember to run grub-mkconfig at all.

    Totally agree, excellent observation!

  • But indeed there ia a problem to generate working grub entry for archbased systems, also from arch itself.

    This is known, without a full solution.

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    http://gofccyourself.com
    my-blog#k
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • @joekamprad said in Antergos boot with other Lx?:

    also from arch itself

    It really is true, there is also the possibility of using only Grub and not Grub2 or directly not using Grub

    It also depends on the experience of each user, whether he uses Windows or not, anyway, there are different situations …

  • @joekamprad
    As far as I know, Manjaro is generating correct grub entries even for Arch-based systems.
    Manjaro’s solution would actually be quite simple to integrate to Antergos and Arch (only one or two files need to be changed slightly!), but I don’t know why it hasn’t been done.

    And there exists a solution for Debian-based systems to generate correct grub entries for Arch-based systems:
    http://askubuntu.com/a/842802
    but it hasn’t been implemented into Debian/Ubuntu/etc. yet AFAIK.

    And there is another (likely independent) problem in os-prober: grub generation may take a lot (about tens of minutes!) of time; that however can be worked around by either installing lsb-release package or pre-mounting the OS partitions.

  • @manuel I just premount the volumes that I know have OSes on them before I run it. Takes about 10 seconds.

  • @manuel said in Antergos boot with other Lx?:

    As far as I know, Manjaro is generating correct grub entries even for Arch-based systems.
    Manjaro’s solution would actually be quite simple to integrate to Antergos and Arch (only one or two files need to be changed slightly!), but I don’t know why it hasn’t been done.

    can you provide a link e.t.c. ???

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    http://gofccyourself.com
    my-blog#k
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • @Palanthis
    Do you have a script for pre-mounting them? That would make it easy.
    Or have you tried to install lsb-release package? Then you shouldn’t need to premount.

  • @manuel No script. I just do it by hand. XD I haven’t tried lsb-release. I would love to test it, though. I concur about Manjaro. It has always correctly identified other OSes during the install and added them to the GRUB menu. I believe it is mounting everything it can find at startup and then running prober during the install. I generally add my other volumes to fstab so I don’t have to auth in to them each time. lol.

  • @joekamprad
    The askubuntu link above shows exactly the same files and places that need to be changed. In Manjaro they have fixes in the same places.

    The files are:
    /usr/lib/linux-boot-probes/mounted/40grub2
    /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober

  • @Palanthis
    I believe Manjaro generated grub entries correctly, but it has the delay problem without premounts or missing lsb-release packages.
    But TBH I haven’t tried Manjaro grub generation for a long time (a year?), so I don’t know the current status in Manjaro.

    EDIT: you could try it and report the results here.
    Just install lsb-release in all Arch based systems (and maybe others?) and comment out the other disk entries in /etc/fstab.

  • @manuel said in Antergos boot with other Lx?:

    The files are:
    /usr/lib/linux-boot-probes/mounted/40grub2
    /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober

    /usr/lib/linux-boot-probes/mounted/40grub2 is different from provided one ther in arch we have already a change similar to what it provides there:

    initrd)
    				initrd="$(echo "$2" | sed 's/(.*)//')"
    				# Initrd same.
    				if [ "$partition" != "$bootpart" ]; then
    					initrd="/boot$initrd"
    				fi
    

    /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober does not exist at arch :(

    So it looks like there was some try on making it work?

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    http://gofccyourself.com
    my-blog#k
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

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