• Scaling for laptops with smaller screens (ThinkPad x270 12")


    Hey guys, I was wondering if there was a possibility to scale the user interface and the screen content to 1.25… You can scale right now to 1* Zoom, or 2*zoom, but there is no perfect medium there.

    I was hoping to see an inbuilt feature that allowed you to scale displays with small resolutions.

    I’m happy with my current set-up, but I hope you guys might be able to roll this out in a future update.

    Thanks again!

  • @dominthomas
    Which DE are you using?
    And could you show the output of

    lspci -k | grep -A5 -i vga
    
  • @manuel I’m running gnome and here you go :)
    00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation HD Graphics 520 (rev 07)
    Subsystem: Lenovo HD Graphics 520
    Kernel driver in use: i915
    Kernel modules: i915
    00:14.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation Sunrise Point-LP USB 3.0 xHCI Controller (rev 21)
    Subsystem: Lenovo Sunrise Point-LP USB 3.0 xHCI Controller

  • @dominthomas
    Try installing gnome-tweak-tool.
    There are settings that should help.

  • To force hi-dpi mode for the entire desktop, gnome-tweak-tool has a control for the scale factor in its Windows tab. You can also override the XSetting manually, using

    gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.xsettings overrides "[{'Gdk/WindowScalingFactor', <2>}]"
    

    Note that the desktop-wide changes require gnome-settings-daemon to be running.
    Source

    0_1510862830128_GNOME-Tweak-Tool-680x495.png

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  • @joekamprad Hey, thank you for that! But it only takes in 1 or 2 as zoom values, 1 is too small (I’m learning to deal with it) and 2 is too big :( . I guess I’ll just wait until they decide to add compatibility for non integer variables so I can shove in 1.25*zoom.

  • @joekamprad said in Scaling for laptops with smaller screens (ThinkPad x270 12"):

    Gdk/WindowScalingFactor

    do you try doing this with the gsettings command? may it is able to take non integer value?

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  • A setting of 2, 3, etc, which is all you can do with scaling-factor, may not be ideal for certain HiDPI displays and smaller screens (e.g. small tablets).

    You can achieve any non-integer scale factor by using a combination of GNOME’s scaling-factor and xrandr.

    First scale GNOME up to the minimum size which is too big. Usually “2” is already too big, otherwise try “3” etc. Then start scaling down by setting zoom-out factor with xrandr. First get the relevant output name, the examples below use eDP1. Start e.g. with zoom-out 1.25 times. If the UI is still too big, increase the scale factor; if it is too small decrease the scale factor.

    $ xrandr --output eDP1 --scale 1.25x1.25
    

    SOURCE

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
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    my-blog#k
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • The output name can be extracted by e.g.

    xrandr --current | grep " connected" | awk '{print $1}'
    

    You can get back to the original scaling with

    xrandr --output eDP1 --scale 1x1
    

    assuming the output name is eDP1.

    By the way, did the Fonts page on gnome-tweak-tool help anything? There is a scale factor not limited to integers.

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