• What to do after a fresh install of Antergos (Gnome) - 10 tips!


    I want to write a short guide on what steps I recommend people to take after they installed Antergos, because the base install isn’t completely okay. Some of these tips are opinion based and mean that I think they are good to apply. Think twice about every tip to know if they are useful for you.

    1. First of all I recommend you to remove lightdm and install gdm. Lightdm limits several options on Antergos and GDM is Gnome’s main display managed and every feature it provides will work together with it. Note that if auto-login is important for you, Antergos doesn’t provide built-in support of that feature with GDM, only with Lightdm.

    So download gdm, disable lightdm with systemctl, enable gdm and reboot. You can also remove light-locker. Instructions:

    sudo pacman -S gdm
    sudo systemctl disable lightdm
    sudo systemctl enable gdm
    sudo pacman -R lightdm
    sudo pacman -R light-locker
    sudo systemctl reboot # warning will immediately reboot and unsaved stuff will be lost in warp space!
    
    1. Enable your monitor to turn of after x time when the computer is not used. This is very important if you care about your hardware and don’t want your monitor to die too fast.
    Go to the Gnome Control Panel > Energy and set the black screen or turn screen off option to the wanted time. My Antergos isn't in English so can't say how it's called exactly.
    
    1. For the same reason above and for less noise: enable standby times for your hard drives.
    Open Gnome Disk Utility, select the drive, open the menu > drive settings and there set the time after you want to drives you want to go into standby mode.
    
    1. Change the default sorting order to type so folders are grouped together sorted alphabetically before files, instead of having them in between them.
    Open D-conf editor and go to: /org/gnome/nautilus/preferences, there change default-sort-order to type.
    
    1. For a better UI experiece download the Arc theme and Papirus icon set and enable them like this:
    Open Gnome tweak tool and go to themes (or layout or whatever it's called in English). Set the applications theme to Arc-Darker, the cursor to Adwaita, icons to Papirus and Shell to Arc-Dark. Note that for the last one you need the User Themes Gnome extension for it to work. You can get that on extensions.gnome.org. Leave the global dark theme disabled (first option).
    
    1. If you’re using an SSD enable the fstrim.timer and disable the automatic trimming done by BTRFS or any other filesystem to improve performance. For BTRFS that means you have to remove the “discard” mount option.
    systemctl enable fstrim
    # then remove the discard mount option from fstab for BTRFS filesystems or whatever else in other cases. Duckduckgo is your friend.
    
    1. For security reasons, disable the bash history because it keeps all the command you perform. If you accidentally type a password as a command, that will make it visible for hackers or malware.
    See: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/18663078/disable-history-in-linux
    
    1. Disable pulseaudio delay for HDMI. If you’re passing through sound through an HDMI cable, your sound could be a bit delayed after some time or some part could be cut off in the beginning.
    See: https://askubuntu.com/questions/218444/sound-output-starts-delayed
    
    1. Remove yaourt and install pacaur. Not much to say about this, I’ll just forward you to this page which will explain all:
    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/AUR_helpers
    

    Note that sudo pacaur doesn’t work. You have to pacaur -S application always, which will then ask you to type the sudo password when necessary.

    1. Disable archives auto extraction. That’s an annoying feature that wastes unnecessary write cycles of your SSD. It also takes up unnecessary time to extract big archives when you don’t really want all the files.
    Right-click on an archive file and select file roller (archive tool or something) as the default application for the archive to always show you which files and folders are in the file instead of extracting everything immediately on a double-click.
    
  • Point 8 = good find!

    To change DM it is enaugh to do a systemctl -f enable gdm this is doing the two steps in one ;)

    And it should be sudo systemctl reboot

    sort order in nautilus can be changed also inside nautilus settings!

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    [Li{u}n//u//{i}x] since 1988 - overcoming failure means success
    howto-install-antergos
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • Right, I just noticed that now for nautilus. In any case, the result is exactly the same :-)

  • Your recommendations, not everybodies.
    I hate such " 10 things to do after installing distro xyz", cause they are subjective, don’t cover everybodies needs and especially yours mainly apply to Gnome only and could cause problems on systems that do not use your DE/ hardware/file system.
    By the way: BTRFS= Better Try a Real File System
    J.

  • @Jeannie____ said in What to do after a fresh install of Antergos - 10 tips!:

    Your recommendations, not everybodies.
    I hate such " 10 things to do after installing distro xyz", cause they are subjective, don’t cover everybodies needs and especially yours mainly apply to Gnome only and could cause problems on systems that do not use your DE/ hardware/file system.

    J.

    Yes topic suggesting this, should be named: the 10 things i do after a fresh Antergos Gnome install

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    [Li{u}n//u//{i}x] since 1988 - overcoming failure means success
    howto-install-antergos
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • @joekamprad said in What to do after a fresh install of Antergos - 10 tips!:

    the 10 things i do after a fresh Antergos Gnome install

    the 10 things i do after a fresh Antergos Gnome install on btrfs…
    J.

  • @EarthMind
    Point 6: is there any reasonable benefit doing TRIM with systemctl instead of fstab>discard?

  • @manuel said in What to do after a fresh install of Antergos - 10 tips!:

    @EarthMind
    Point 6: is there any reasonable benefit doing TRIM with systemctl instead of fstab>discard?

    https://forum.antergos.com/topic/6683/ssd-harddisk-continuous-trim-vs-periodic-trim

    Questioning on SSD is to have less writes, so a periodic TRIM is better in my opinion, and having the discard option into fstab is doing continious TRIM.

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    [Li{u}n//u//{i}x] since 1988 - overcoming failure means success
    howto-install-antergos
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • @joekamprad
    Thanks for the info!
    So continuous TRIM (discard) may be bad for some older SSDs, but OK for other (newer) SSDs.
    But periodic TRIM is good for all, so I’ll probably start using that, since it shouldn’t have much downsides.

  • @manuel keep in mind if you do so start the systemd timer: as only enable will result in failed startup, seems to need a manual start to get it working.

    systemctl start fstrim.timer
    systemctl enable fstrim.timer

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    [Li{u}n//u//{i}x] since 1988 - overcoming failure means success
    howto-install-antergos
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • @joekamprad OK, thanks!

  • –edit title-- to be more clear

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    [Li{u}n//u//{i}x] since 1988 - overcoming failure means success
    howto-install-antergos
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • joekamprad, unless I’m not respecting some kind of policy, I don’t appreciate at all you modifying my own posts. And for the record, except for one tip, this topic has nothing to do with BTRFS. I edited it back

    Have you both even read the disclaimer before complaining:

    “Some of these tips are opinion based and mean that I think they are good to apply. Think twice about every tip to know if they are useful for you.”

    News for you guys: these top lists are ALWAYS subjective. This form of writing a title is just one way of doing it.

    Thanks for filling this page with useless posts instead of keeping it on topic, with the goal to help people out that actually have a use for these specific tips…

  • keep calm @EarthMind there is no policy like this, i was trying to help only to make topic more clear.
    i am impartial.
    And totally agree, that if you do not want to change the topic, it will stay like this…
    //offtopic ends here please!//

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    [Li{u}n//u//{i}x] since 1988 - overcoming failure means success
    howto-install-antergos
    how to add system logs
    i3 GNOME

  • @Jeannie____ said in What to do after a fresh install of Antergos - 10 tips!:

    Your recommendations, not everybodies.
    I hate such " 10 things to do after installing distro xyz", cause they are subjective, don’t cover everybodies needs and especially yours mainly apply to Gnome only and could cause problems on systems that do not use your DE/ hardware/file system.
    By the way: BTRFS= Better Try a Real File System
    J.

    While I don’t agree with anything you mentioned, I do understand the point about Gnome and I think it’s better to make that clear. Since I’ve always been mainly a Gnome user, I forget to see the variety in the Linux DE scene.

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