• Cnchi Stuck With KDE...


    If you choose KDE, Cnchi will hang on resolving dependencies or checking conflicts. The offending package appears to be a conflict between qtcurve-qt5 and the newer qtcurve-kde.

  • I’m having the same issue! Each time it hangs on checking inter conflicts…

    The installer log ends with:
    2017-09-27 14:17:00 [ERROR] pac.py(557) cb_log(): unresolvable package conflicts detected
    2017-09-27 14:17:01 [INFO] slides.py(268) manage_events_from_cb_queue(): Checking inter conflicts…

  • The old qtcurve-qt5 is explicitely installed by Cnchi. We should wait until @lots.0.logs replaces it with the newer qtcurve-kde in packages.xml, I’m afraid.

    qtcurve-kde makes part of antergos-kde-setup metapackage:

    ┌──[just]@[alexasp]:~$
    └─> pactree --reverse qtcurve-kde
    qtcurve-kde
    └─antergos-kde-setup
    ┌──[just]@[alexasp]:~$
    └─> 
    

    I believe that qtcurve-qt5 was a part of antergos-kde-setup as well. If it’s true, then antergos-kde-setup dependencies tree must also be adjusted.

  • @just

    I decided to just install with Xfce and run antergos-kde-setup. It installed qtcurve-kde as a dependency for plasma-nm. Looks like that is a viable option for anyone that wants to install now.

  • It sounds like this is something the @developers might be interested to know though ;).

    Keep trying, never give up. In the end, you will find that it was all worth it

    Community ISO: https://antergoscommunityeditions.wordpress.com
    Linux Basics: https://linuxbasicssite.wordpress.com

  • @Myantra Same problem here. Was able to install with xfce but developers need to fix it.

  • Same problem here. I have been searching the internet for a 17.8 ISO.torrent but I cannot find anything providing checksum / signed. Antergos itself doesn’t provide older versions or do they?

    Edit @developers : I found this site https://antergos.com/blog/category/iso-releases/ claiming to provide older installation media, but no matter which link you click, they all refer to the lastest 17.9 version. The article’s content is from 2015 promoting GNOME 3.16, so this site is outdated anyway and should be updated or taken down.

  • https://github.com/Antergos/Cnchi/commit/d65d2c1f0dc10517a5c30568e8c26ff8fbcf12f2

    Thank you all for the warning!

    I found this site https://antergos.com/blog/category/iso-releases/ claiming to provide older installation media, but no matter which link you click, they all refer to the lastest 17.9 version. The article’s content is from 2015 promoting GNOME 3.16, so this site is outdated anyway and should be updated or taken down.

    That’s an old post, yes. There was a time we provided old media and also testing media… but this proved too much work for us (and also many problems), so we stopped doing it.

  • @karasu Thank you! I now downloaded the 17.8 ISO from https://sourceforge.net/projects/antergos/files/mirror/iso/release/ including signature and md5sum and will go for the installation now.

    Edit: works as expected, so if you need to install Antergos KDE right now, follow the above link.

  • I went and put on manjaro kde with no problem after I couldn’t with antergos. Big problem and it’s not only installing. It also occurs while updating, pacman -Syu in antergos saying there’s a “conflict between qtcurve-kde and qtcurve-qt5, delete qtcurve-qt5?”. On one computer I accepted this and system was updated. On another computer I updated with system updater and this crashed the system, was not able to boot. I suspect qtcurve-qt5 problem.

    What is a newcommer supposed to make of this? And what are we supposed to do about qtcurve options?

  • @lmcogs

    By the time Friday rolled around, I was able to install Antergos/KDE several times during the weekend with the 17.9 ISO I had previously downloaded. Once packages.xml was updated to replace qtcurve-qt5 with qtcurve-kde, that issue was resolved.

    As Manjaro uses different repos, I doubt Manjaro was ever affected by it. That is where the difference between Manjaro and Antergos is so obviously illustrated. Antergos gives you a GUI installer for their flavor of Arch, but the resulting install is very much Arch. When the Arch repos update/rename a package, it might break Cnchi for a little while. Manjaro is more like a distro based on Arch, in the way Ubuntu is based on Debian. It has access to AUR, but the rest of the default repos are Manjaro instead of Arch.

    Personally, I always do updates with pacman, and just use the update notifier to tell me when to take a look at what updates are available. Terminal gives you a better idea of what is going on throughout the process, and possible solutions, than a GUI.

  • @lmcogs

    I forgot to address what a newcomer should do. In all honesty, I would not recommend Antergos for anyone new to Linux, that is not already adept at GoogleFu and/or has access to personal help. Antergos is fantastic at removing the pain from and shortening an Arch install, but it is still rolling-release Arch. Anyone installing it should be prepared for things to not work after install, or things to be broken by updates. With the exception of perhaps Manjaro, no one looking to wade into LInux with an Ubuntu or Mint experience should be looking at a distro that has anything to do with Arch. A newcomer to Antergos (or Arch) should always expect to exercise patience and a degree of self-help.

  • @Myantra Well said.

    The extremely easy installation is the Antergos weakest point. It gives a false impression that the installed system - Arch Linux - is as easy to manage as Windows or Ubuntu. Once Antergos is installed, a newbie knows nothing about Arch, and is in trouble.

    The difficult installation is the Arch Linux strongest point. A user is forced to learn a lot about Arch and Linux. Once Arch is installed, a user knows so much about it that easily solves all inconveniences.

  • @just

    I do think Antergos is good for a new user that is wanting to really learn Linux. It is not as intimidating as trying to install Arch, nor does it prevent you from learning much by making things as simple as possible. You get an Arch install, with your DE of choice (and some Antergos tweaks), but it is up to you to customize and maintain an Arch install. Most things will work properly after first boot, and anything that does not is a good learning experience. Maintaining or making things work on Antergos will still require you to research and understand what is going on, rather than simply find a convenient how-to and mindlessly repeat steps.

    If someone just wants to move to Linux in order to ditch Windows, I send them to Ubuntu, Mint, or even Fedora. If they want to learn Linux by skipping the shallow end of the pool, but not drown in the deep end, I recommend Antergos. I think it is the best distro out there for someone that actually wants to learn, but that is the extent to which it is appropriate for any new user.

  • @just said in Cnchi Stuck With KDE...:

    The extremely easy installation is the Antergos weakest point. It gives a false impression that the installed system - Arch Linux - is as easy to manage as Windows or Ubuntu. Once Antergos is installed, a newbie knows nothing about Arch, and is in trouble.

    Sadly, I agree (about the Windows part, not the Ubuntu one).

    The difficult installation is the Arch Linux strongest point. A user is forced to learn a lot about Arch and Linux. Once Arch is installed, a user knows so much about it that easily solves all inconveniences.

    Well, I strongly disagree here. Knowing how to install Arch following the wiki steps does not teach you anything about how Arch works (and it’s just worse if you only follow those steps blindly, which many people do). And even if you understand how creating your partitions and formatting them works, or how to install your base system with pacstrap, this serves you nothing when you have to face your system administration later.

    In the end, the difficult installation only serves to scare people that do not want to use their keyboard to copy paste a bunch of commands from the Arch wiki ;)

    Just my two cents.

  • @karasu said in Cnchi Stuck With KDE...:

    And even if you understand how creating your partitions and formatting them works, or how to install your base system with pacstrap, this serves you nothing when you have to face your system administration later.

    Entirely agree here:slight_smile:. Perhaps it might help a bit in that the user is now less timid of delving underneath into the dark realms of the unknown and the CLI, but other than that, I don’t really understand it’s value. However, I would agree that it is a good experience to have at least once in your life. It’s certainly on my mental to-do list!

    Keep trying, never give up. In the end, you will find that it was all worth it

    Community ISO: https://antergoscommunityeditions.wordpress.com
    Linux Basics: https://linuxbasicssite.wordpress.com

  • Part of the problem is lack of clear information or explanations. For example this thread is about qtcurve-kde and qtcurve-qt5. What is the problem here and the differernce between these? I have search the web and can find nothing.

    For example when updating I am still getting the option qtcurve-kde and qtcurve-qt5 are incompatible, delete qtcurve-qt5? accepting seems to be ok.

  • @lmcogs

    qtcurve-qt5 was replaced by qtcurve-kde. In the context of updating an existing install, qtcurve-kde is the newer package. Until an update, Cnchi was looking for qtcurve-qt5, which was not available, so it hung. On an installed system, pacman handles it better. This was only an issue because the package name changed.

    Why the package name changed, and what differences there are, is beyond the scope of Antergos. If I recall correctly, it was part of a larger KDE update. The only repo that Antergos has control of is their own. This update was from the Arch repos.

    If you want to do some reading:

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/qt
    https://www.archlinux.org/packages/community/x86_64/qtcurve-kde/
    https://www.archlinux.org/packages/community/x86_64/qtcurve-qt5/

    It appears the primary difference between packages is KDE integration.

  • Thanks myantra that was helpful

  • I’m facing similar issue. Trying to install Antergos 17.10 ISO with KDE results in Cnchi error 85785. Is there a way to fix it?

    UPDATE:
    /tmp/cnchi.log says:
    2017-10-07 09:05:22 [ERROR] pac.py(161) finalize_transaction(): Can't finalize alpm transaction: transaction failed, pm_errno 49 (conflicting files), [('adwaita-icon-theme', '/install/usr/share/icons/Adwaita/c$

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