• Cannot install Kuser


    Re: How to administer users and groups graphically under Plasma5?

    If it does not work: What is the command to add a user to the group “optical”? k3b wants the actual user in the group otical.
    I searched for more than an hour in books an internet.:confused:

  • @semperlin said in Cannot install Kuser:

    What is the command to add a user to the group “optical”?

    sudo gpasswd -a $USER optical
    
  • I would not have thought that this command works.
    Thank you!

  • @semperlin Remember to log out and then log back in after running the command. Or reboot.

  • Since the topic is “Cannot install Kuser”, I have the same problem.

    I too tried to install it, and it was only in the AUR, but that did not work and the “Make” opperation was aborted. A log file was created, but I can’t tell from it what exactly went wrong, as it contains no errors (at least nothing marked as an error). Here’s the most telling output from pamac:

    Could NOT find KF5 (missing: KDELibs4Support) (found version "5.5.3")
    

    So I guess it won’t work with Plasma 5.5.3.

    So the next question would be: Is there a version of Kuser for Plasma 5.5.3, and if so where do I get it?

    Too many users and groups to assign, and in konsole it is a big hassle.

    The flazzum you spizz, the zoider you splat!

  • Kuser is replaced by plasma user-manager, and not shipped anymore…
    https://www.archlinux.org/packages/extra/x86_64/user-manager/

    As you can see here:
    https://community.kde.org/Applications/16.12_Release_Notes#Tarballs_that_we_have_split

    [updates once a week] = [90% less problems]
    [Li{u}n//u//{i}x] since 1988 - overcoming failure means success
    howto-install-antergos
    how to add system logs
    i3-wm#gnome-shell

  • @joekamprad Thanks, for the links. Although an answer, those links just open more questions, and as usual have no explanation what so ever (a Linux thing) as to why. No easy way to know why Kuser was discontinued and why it’s replacement is such a retarded regression rather than being an equal replacement or even an improvement. Good documentation is a rare find over at KDE. Plasma is turning out to be just like a super model; all looks, but no substance.

    The flazzum you spizz, the zoider you splat!

  • That’s in one the point exactly what I wanted to say. Plasma-user fails to deliver a convenient way to make settings in a graphic way.
    @just told me the command ```

    sudo gpasswd -a $USER optical
    

    I never understood in the manpages that this was the way to add a user to a group.
    Regression is the rigth expression.

  • @semperlin Well it is good to know, but it does not list all of the possible groups, nor weather there is a requirement to be in a specific group or not to make use of specific features… Every distro seems to have different defaults and requirements, like I have found out the hard way. And I have also found out that getting any clear and detailed information on anything, can only be done the hard way. Even worse: Once you figured out how to do something, it changes.

    Strange how after digging for hours, days and sometimes even weeks, you can find an answer somewhere deep in the bowels of git, bug reports, or articles with general topics, often by sheer accident as they may arise in topics only remotely related.

    I have seen multiple bug reports with 10 pages of threads of developers explaining the details of something (the same thing in many places), when what they should really do is either explain it on the page for the app itself in the first place, or at least when the question Erises, and then in the bug report just add a link to it, instead of explaining it all over again. That way they would spend more time developing apps and fixing bugs, and less time helping (often arguing) with frustrated people, who can’t find answers where they would expect them.

    I expect to find the details on KDE apps and components on KDE’s site, not on Arch, Ubuntu or any other site or deep within forums.

    The info is out there somewhere, but instead of finding it at the source and in context, you have to collect it from all over the place, piece it together, and hope that you can make sense of it all, and prey that there is no misinformation or outdated and no longer applicable info as is most often the case, making it all worthless!

    The flazzum you spizz, the zoider you splat!

  • @Zoidmo said in Cannot install Kuser:

    …it does not list all of the possible groups,…

    To list all groups in a system

    cut -d: -f1 /etc/group
    

    To list all groups the current user belongs to

    groups
    

    To list all groups of a specific user

    groups [user]
    

    …nor weather there is a requirement to be in a specific group or not to make use of specific features… Every distro seems to have different defaults and requirements…

    Yes, you’re right. Groups meaning may vary from distro to distro. Worse yet, groups with the same name may have different GIDs in different distros.

    A user may create or delete groups as he needs or wishes, and assign them any GID and meaning he wants.

    …And I have also found out that getting any clear and detailed information on anything, can only be done the hard way.

    You’re right again.

    …Even worse: Once you figured out how to do something, it changes.

    You’re almost right here too. Though groups meaning remain stable and usually doesn’t vary inside a single distro.

    For me, the Zim Desktop Wiki tool is of enormous help. It keeps all info, found and gathered with years. For now, it holds about 5000 notes with various tips, tricks, howtos, links, etc. about everything. Can’t imagine how to live without it.

  • @Zoidmo @just My Linux-bible by Kofler is my comprehensive collection of commands. But it does’nt help really because I’m not a nerd. I only want to do my work and sometimes - not very often - I need an important hint. Without help of the forum I would waste my time unsuccesfully.
    Time to thank all assistants!!!
    But what about Zim. I know it till now as an empty wiki that you have to fill by yourselves. Where are the 5000 notes??

  • @semperlin said in Cannot install Kuser:

    But what about Zim. I know it till now as an empty wiki that you have to fill by yourselves.

    Exactly. You start with an empty wiki.

    Where are the 5000 notes?

    I wasn’t clear enough. It’s my own wiki. Started from 0 somewhere in 2005 it grown up to this size, for now. It grows constantly, I constantly add new notes to it, modify old ones, never delete even the oldest, the process never stops. It’s like a personal diary, about Linux and the rest of the life :) .

  • I thought so. But a good hint! Why did I not found this solution by myself?

  • “But it does’nt help really because I’m not a nerd. I only want to do my work and sometimes”

    I need to get my work done all the time, but it has nothing to do with computers, besides their office uses, and there’s the catch!

    Add up the trouble of keeping up with the OS and its workings, and all of the various software I have to use, including their bugs and oddities, add in the brick walls you run into… and my work? My hand craft which takes patience, precision and concentration, so that I too can make products, preferably of the kind that rarely need maintenance and are a breeze to use? I have good amount of tool maintenance and shop keep too. I can’t just turn of a wood shop at night with a few clicks, and back on in the morning clean and ready to go…

    The flazzum you spizz, the zoider you splat!

  • @just Listing the groups as you described (cut -d: -f1 /etc/group) leaves out the numbers associated with the groups. Initially I thought that you made a typo: cut (cat), but cut worked. :confused:

    Through some “Hard Way” research I just found : cat /etc/group
    I also found out that my user does not have a group, as I am used to with other distro’s, all which always make a group for each user of the same name, and always starting with 1000 so, I was always user bob, belonging to group bob AKA user 1000 of group 1000. Then rde (1001)/rde (1001) for my business.

    I have no way of knowing why this differs, and who made the call to make it different in Antergos or Arch, but it messes with permissions set in another distro and hampers me from accessing my own files. I used to share those files without problems between two distros, and could read write and create files from both, as long as the user and group names and numbers were alike on both, there were no problems.

    I am sure there is a way to set these, but now I have hours of research ahead of me; as usual.:confounded:

    The flazzum you spizz, the zoider you splat!

  • @Zoidmo said in Cannot install Kuser:

    Initially I thought that you made a typo: cut (cat), but cut worked.

    Warning: long text ahead.

    No, it wasn’t a typo. cut and cat are two different commands. cut removes sections from each line of a file (edits it) and prints out the result. cat (eventually) concatenates more files and prints them out on standard output, without modifying the displayed content.

    cat /etc/group simply displays unmodified /etc/group content. cut -d: -f1 /etc/group truncates the numbers, as you call them, and prints out only group names.

    Group names have no meaning for Linux. They are for humans only. For Linux each group is identified by the Group ID (GID). Linux uses GIDs, not group names.

    BTW, user names aren’t have any meaning for Linux too. They are for humans. Linux uses User Identifiers (UIDs) to operate with users.

    You’re absolutely right - to access the same files from different distros without permissions complications those files should have the same GID and be owned by the same UID in all distros.

    Seems like you’re describing the configuration of my computers. Each computer has a number of various, independent Linuxes. Each computer also has one (or two) huge common data partition, shared between all Linuxes. I keep all user data files there - docs, pics, audio, video, photo, everything.

    To be accessed without permission troubles from any Linux all files and folders in shared data partition must belong to same GIDs and be owned by the same UIDs.

    How to find out a user’s UID, all groups he belongs to, along with their GIDs? Pretty simple:

    id
    

    It will return your UID and all your GIDs, with descriptive, human group names. Just align UID and GIDs between all your Linuxes, to avoid acceess problems to your data from any Linux.

    GIDs may be changed with groupmod command. UIDs may be changed with usermod command. Both are extremely dangerous. It’s better to not use them if you aren’t skilled enough. For this reason I won’t describe how to use them.

    The better and much safer way to get rid of permissions problems is to use chown and eventually chmod commands. An example. I try to use uid=1000(just) with primary group gid=100(users) in all Linuxes. If a newly installed Linux deviates from this convention - which happens very rarely, - I change UID and primary GID to these values.

    Then, from any Linux, I simply change the ownership to the user just and to the group users, for all files and folders in the shared data partition(s). All data on them are hold in the /1st (first shared partiion) and /2nd (second data partition) folders. These two are like a traditional ~/home folder.

    sudo chown -cR just:users /1st /2nd
    

    Eventually, I grant read-write access to all files and subfolders in the /1st and /2nd:

    sudo chmod -cR ugo+rw /1st /2nd
    

    Done. All files are freely accessible now, from any Linux.

    There’s no a standard for GIDs (and group names) in Linux. Conventionally, main, big distros - like Arch, Debian, Suse, Fedora, Gentoo - maintain identical GIDs and group names for similar purposes. Like, for example, the UID=1000 for the first regular user in the system, and GID=1000 with a group with user’s name - when|if it is created.

    Their smaller, younger, home-made clones sometimes deviate from a good sense and create unusual UIDs and GIDs - uselessly complicating the life of their end users. Examples are:

    • Gecko in Suse world. Initially used 2000 for UID and primary user’s GID. Corrected to the commonly used 1000 some time ago and works flawlessly now.

    • Apricity in Arch world. For unknown reason used 1001 for UID and primary GID until its death a year ago.

    • Funtoo in Gentoo world. Uses conventional 1000 now.

    • Fuduntu in Fedora world. An excellent Fedora’s clone, unfortunately dead about 4 years ago.

    To summarize.

    • boot into each your Linux

    • get your UID and GIDs inside it

      id
      
    • find out the most commonly used UID and primary GID

    • change the ownership of shared data to most commonly used UID and GID

    • done

    Regards

  • Thanks @just, I do frequent the Arch wiki and have found the “Users and groups” page…

    Poked around a bit, and the user I created during installation doesn’t even have a primary group (missing in both /etc/group and also /etc/passwd). I created another user with useradd and that worked right, it created a user with a UID, primary group of same name and GID number and a home folder, strangely users created that way do not show up in the “user manager” in system settings.

    Double whammy: They nixed Kuser which worked well and had more extensive options, and replaced it with a useless POS, that does very little, and can’t even get that right!

    USERGROUPS_ENAB yes is present in the login.defs file too, and not remarked out.

    The flazzum you spizz, the zoider you splat!

  • @Zoidmo said in Cannot install Kuser:

    Double whammy: They nixed Kuser which worked well and had more extensive options, and replaced it with a useless POS, that does very little, and can’t even get that right!

    Replacing well working, well established, feature rich environments by their limited, poor, unreliable counterparts is a common trend in recent years. Plasma still implements only about a two thirds of features which were present - and still work perfectly - in KDE Software Compilation.

    I believe that evolution follows the ascending spirale. Sooner or later Gnome Nth and Plasma will regain the lost Gnome 2 and KDE functionality. Probably, they’ll become more user-friendly and useful again, at a higher level.

  • @just I Can’t agree more! Gnome’s so called improvements (cramming everything in their apps into a single menu…) is the main reason I use KDE now. When It first came along in Firefox, I was pissed, but found out that I could turn the menu back on, gnome just killed them entirely and defends it as necessary change, and to gain screen real estate: I call BS, menus make a whole lot of sense, and monitors are gaining resolution and size, not shrinking! Their developers even blame complaining users for just not liking change, when in fact they did cripple some and removed other features. They “fixed” something that was not broken. Next they are going to nix spell checking because too few people take the time to use it, inadvertently adding to the rampantly growing lack of education and logic that makes those idiotic decisions possible in the first place!

    “Plasma still implements only about a two thirds of features which were present - and still work perfectly - in KDE Software Compilation.”

    What do you mean by “and still work perfectly - in KDE Software Compilation” Do you mean in the old KDE, prior to Plasma?

    The flazzum you spizz, the zoider you splat!

  • @Zoidmo said in Cannot install Kuser:

    Do you mean in the old KDE, prior to Plasma?

    Yes, I do. I mean a traditional, human-oriented KDE Software Compilation, discontinued in August 2014 and replaced with Plasma (a short name for three pieces - KDE Frameworks 5 + KDE Plasma 5 + KDE Applications).

    0_1503296484901_debian-8-jessie-kde-software-compilation-4.14.2.png

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