• BTRFS, a word of caution!


    Yesterday I suffered a crash on my Desktop/Server. I paid the price for a choice I made 1,5 years ago when I installed it.

    Choosing BTRFS as my main FS on my main machine which I planned to keep going for 5+ years.

    Listen to the warnings of others, BTRFS is not stable yet, and should not be used if you value your data.

    I checked and rechecked the disk and with all the error messages i am sure it was BTRFS that is to blame. The partition is impossible to save. Luckily i have backup of every LXC and important things. But my nextcloud server was completed 2 days ago and I did not back it up yet :(.

    So, use something else for your important systems.

    I make things work…
    My humble wiki: https://anotherlinux.com/

  • @izznogooood Agreed: On Lunduke hour (on youtube) a few weeks ago, a Pogo Linux employee was interviewed and he said he would not roll out BTRFS right now because it hasn’t evolved to a sufficient level (and he listed what was problematic if you want to watch the video) - I’ve used ZFS on BSD and it was awesome, and the man being interviewed said he was fine with officially using linux ZFS (OpenZFS I think).

    I'm not from this planet but if you speak to me nicely I may choose not to enslave you (for now anyway)…

  • BTRFS: Better Try a Real FIle System.
    J.

  • Why would you blame it on BTRFS while your system crashed? There could’ve been a lot going on that eventually broke your partition. How did you try to save your partition?

    You used it as a single disk without any RAID “back-up”?

    Do realise that there are plenty of people running BTRFS systemseven longer than you initially planned to use it. Even Synology uses it as a default filesystem for the NAS devices and they wouldn’t make such a move without thoroughly testing it first because they have a lot of enterprise customers.

    While I feel for your loss, I feel more that it’s a case of wishful thinking. Let’s blame it on that because that’s the easiest. Although I could be wrong of course.

    To be honest, I’d rather keep choosing for BTRFS that has had it’s eye on Linux since the beginning, than a port of ZFS. The later may be rock solid, but let’s not forget that it’s certainly the case on BSD systems, but doesn’t count as much as for the Linux port.

    Antergos & Windows 7 Pro | Asrock x370 K4 - Ryzen 1600 - GTX 950 (replace with Radeon 570/580/Vega) - 16GB DDR4 2400 - Samsung 960 pro 512GB (Windows) + Samsung 850 EVO 256 GB (Antergos) + 2x 2TB HGST HDD + more storage - RM550x Gold PSU

  • @izznogooood said in BTRFS, a word of caution!:

    I checked and rechecked the disk and with all the error messages i am sure it was BTRFS that is to blame.

    Yes I am sure the problem was related to BTRFS. What I failed to mention is the disk is perfectly fine. In fact I am using i right know. Re-formated with EXT4.

    The initial problem was RAM related which led to corruption on the BTRFS partition. This would not have happened if I would have used EXT4, ZFS or simuler file systems.

    @EarthMind said in BTRFS, a word of caution!:

    Why would you blame it on BTRFS while your system crashed? There could’ve been a lot going on that eventually broke your partition. How did you try to save your partition?

    My system did not crash, my BTRFS partition crashed…

    Even Synology uses it as a default filesystem for the NAS devices

    Yes, for their RAID partitions, which is of little consequence if one is lost… They dont use it on the system partitions, why do you think that is?

    While I feel for your loss, I feel more that it’s a case of wishful thinking. Let’s blame it on that because that’s the easiest. Although I could be wrong of course.

    Yes, you could be wrong ;)

    If you want to use it thats great, Ill wait until it matures a little…

    https://twitter.com/btrfs/status/762589934662193152

    I make things work…
    My humble wiki: https://anotherlinux.com/

  • @izznogooood The instability of RAID 5/6 has already been know for a long time yes. I’m currently trying out a new BTRFS setup with subvolumes on my laptop to try all the features out. But I have to say, one thing that really disappoints me is the lack of consistent documentation on the net. A lot is outdated, not clear or very typical use that you can find documented everywhere.

    Antergos & Windows 7 Pro | Asrock x370 K4 - Ryzen 1600 - GTX 950 (replace with Radeon 570/580/Vega) - 16GB DDR4 2400 - Samsung 960 pro 512GB (Windows) + Samsung 850 EVO 256 GB (Antergos) + 2x 2TB HGST HDD + more storage - RM550x Gold PSU

  • @EarthMind said in BTRFS, a word of caution!:

    But I have to say, one thing that really disappoints me is the lack of consistent documentation on the net. A lot is outdated, not clear or very typical use that you can find documented everywhere.

    I agree completely! I loved btrfs and would still use it if it were not for som faulty RAM. Its a great filesystem! But with little children my free time is not like it used to be, so I will stick to the better safe then sorry method these few years ;).

    I make things work…
    My humble wiki: https://anotherlinux.com/

  • @izznogooood I plan to write a decent guide of all the fragments of useful information I found on the net later. So if you are ever interested in doing some tests again, this will hopefully help you plenty.

    I’ll put it also on the wiki

    Antergos & Windows 7 Pro | Asrock x370 K4 - Ryzen 1600 - GTX 950 (replace with Radeon 570/580/Vega) - 16GB DDR4 2400 - Samsung 960 pro 512GB (Windows) + Samsung 850 EVO 256 GB (Antergos) + 2x 2TB HGST HDD + more storage - RM550x Gold PSU

  • That sounds great, please post a link here when you are done!

    I make things work…
    My humble wiki: https://anotherlinux.com/

  • Red Hat will stop supporting Btrfs

    The Btrfs file system has been in Technology Preview state since the initial release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat will not be moving Btrfs to a fully supported feature and it will be removed in a future major release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

    The Btrfs file system did receive numerous updates from the upstream in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 and will remain available in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 series. However, this is the last planned update to this feature.

    Red Hat will continue to invest in future technologies to address the use cases of our customers, specifically those related to snapshots, compression, NVRAM, and ease of use. We encourage feedback through your Red Hat representative on features and requirements you have for file systems and storage technology.

    An announcement that does not clarify the reasons for this decision, but anticipates that Red Hat will continue to work on a similar solution. Perhaps by enhancing its default XFS file system and incorporating Permabit technology (a recently acquired company specialized in deduplication and data compression), perhaps collaborating on the development of new CoW (Copy on Write) file systems such as Bcachefs.

    In any case, RHEL 7.4 will be the last edition to support Btrfs, a project that began to be developed in 2007 under the umbrella of Oracle, trying to respond to some shortcomings of current Linux file systems.

    Among the current companies contributing to the Btrfs project are: Facebook, Fujitsu, Fusion-IO, Intel, Linux Foundation, Netgear, SUSE, Oracle, STRATO AG and Red Hat itself.

    In recent times has tried to position itself as a competitor to ZFS in terms of scalability and ease of use. A ZFS that your move to Linux for licensing issues is always conflicting.
    Among the advanced features of Btrfs is the ability to create snapshots that under the “Copy on Write” principle allow you to revert any changes made after an upgrade or integration with RAID (with your corruption problems in RAID 5 / 6 also, everything must be said).

    These are features that many users -especially on the desktop- do not use, so most distros choose the always reliable ext4 or the mentioned XFS, which offers excellent performance when handling large files.

    Of the GNU / Linux distributions are possibly openSUSE and SLES the ones that bet most by Btrfs, to the point of making it their default file system.

    Source: http://lamiradadelreplicante.com/

    Autodidacta en la VIDA …y en Linux, también.

  • @izznogooood Here is the result: https://blog.wheredoi.click/installing-antergos-with-a-btrfs-filesytem-and-subvolumes/

    I’m planning to clean it up a bit and put it on the wiki too later

    Antergos & Windows 7 Pro | Asrock x370 K4 - Ryzen 1600 - GTX 950 (replace with Radeon 570/580/Vega) - 16GB DDR4 2400 - Samsung 960 pro 512GB (Windows) + Samsung 850 EVO 256 GB (Antergos) + 2x 2TB HGST HDD + more storage - RM550x Gold PSU

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