• What Made you Choose Antergos


    So What made you choose Antergos?

    For me I was tired of the issues with Ubuntu, Fedora based distros, I also wanted more to test my knowledge as I didn’t like the software centers included with the distros, with the Pacman I can find almost any software that I need and its easy to install as well as the well documented Wiki that I can find almost all my answers to my questions

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  • For me, it’s the fact that Antergos is not bloated. It’s light and it perform well, I really appreciate that. I also like the fact that you can choose your DE in Cnchi and customize your installation. AUR access is quite nice as well.

    New Linux user | No more Windows in my life No more Windows at home | In love with Antergos && Arch! | A lot to learn!

  • @iSpeakVeryWell said in What Made you Choose Antergos:

    For me, it’s the fact that Antergos is not bloated. It’s light and it perform well, I really appreciate that. I also like the fact that you can choose your DE in Cnchi and customize your installation. AUR access is quite nice as well.

    Exactly! Those are all of the reasons I chose Antergos, listed in order of importance. The fact that it is not bloated is what set it apart from Manjaro for me.

    Keep trying, never give up. In the end, you will find that it was all worth it

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/antergos-deepin
    https://linuxbasicssite.wordpress.com

  • @A-User said in What Made you Choose Antergos:

    Exactly! Those are all of the reasons I chose Antergos, listed in order of importance. The fact that it is not bloated is what set it apart from Manjaro for me.

    Same here! I discovered Manjaro first! It helped me to understand I absolutely wanted to use an Arch based distro. But once I found Antergos, I couldn’t get back to Manjaro, I was hooked! :p

    New Linux user | No more Windows in my life No more Windows at home | In love with Antergos && Arch! | A lot to learn!

  • I had played with a lot of different distros through the years as secondary OS’s to Windows. When Windows 10 came out, I’d decided not to upgrade and to use a Linux distro as my main and just use Windows 7 for anything Linux couldn’t handle (games and such).

    I settled on Ubuntu Mate Edition (I was mostly familiar with Ubuntu/Debian based distros). At one point not long after installing, the Mate toolbar broke. Not just once but a couple of times destroying my setup. I was annoyed.

    I noticed that while doing anything intensive (updating for example) the system would take very excessive time to switch to already open windows and really didn’t seem happy having to do more than one task at a time. I was more annoyed.

    Finally, I started noticing how it seemed to take an extra beat or two before clicks registered, not a massively long time, just enough to where I always felt like I was waiting.

    So I decided I’d make a new partition and test drive replacements for Ubuntu Mate. Over to Distrowatch I went to find a candidate and noticed Antergos petty high in the rankings.

    I’d heard of Arch of course but never attempted to install it. I had played with Chakra in the past for a bit (I think it was Arch based with KDE then. It definitely used some Arch pieces. Pacman for installing, updating etc, Arch Repos).

    So, I installed Antergos, loved the OS boot screen, loved the Antergos log-in screen (good first impressions) loved how much snappier everything was and never looked back.

    I still have that Ubuntu partition, but never use it. It’s an emergency back-up at this point. I thought about using it for other distos I’d like to play around with to see what they’re like. Something like Void or Hawaii or Devuan.

    I’m just very content with my Antergos right now. No real issues, does everything I need.

    Thanks for all your good work Devs, Mods, Contributors!

  • I was also tired with ubuntu issues. They try to make it stable, but in my opinion, they just make it more prone to issues by holding back packages. In the end, I was really annoyed closing the pop-up windows alerting system errors.

    Pacman is one of the best package managers, and including AUR, arch based distros are just really good. For example, ubuntu based distros requires third party PPA’s for relatively new software. They just make the package managing much more difficult. If you need a software in arch linux, just make an AUR package for it so everyone can grab it. That’s all.

    Of course, antergos team did a great job by providing simplicity of arch linux in a lightweight environment removing time consuming system configurations out of the question. I already did that once when I installed vanilla arch linux, there is no further need for me.

  • @psscnp142 said in What Made you Choose Antergos:

    just make an AUR package for it so everyone can grab it. That’s all.

    Speaking of making AUR packages, how can one do this? I might be creating one soon but don’t know how.

    Thanks for the help in advance:grinning:

    Keep trying, never give up. In the end, you will find that it was all worth it

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/antergos-deepin
    https://linuxbasicssite.wordpress.com

  • First step is to read these carefully, understand the rules and the process. https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Arch_User_Repository
    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/PKGBUILD

    The basic idea is to prepare a script to install a software so that anyone can download the script and install the software as you do. But remember, creating packages is not the important part, you need to maintain your packages.

    See a basic example here,
    https://aur.archlinux.org/cgit/aur.git/tree/PKGBUILD?h=astromatic-sextractor

    In PKGBUILD files, there are some definitions in front. Then, the functions come. “build” function is where you configure and compile the software. So, equivalent to “./configure && make”. Then, you move the installation files to where they need to live in “package” function, equivalent to “make install”. Then, you can go to the directory where PKGBUILD lives and try to install the software via “makepkg” command. And upload the file to AUR server, when you are done.

    If you are not sure about dependencies and etc, it is always a good idea to share your PKGBUILD in the community to get comments.

    If you have questions, open a new thread and ask them in there.

  • Thank you so much:slight_smile:

    Keep trying, never give up. In the end, you will find that it was all worth it

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/antergos-deepin
    https://linuxbasicssite.wordpress.com

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