• Silent Boot?


    I’ve been trying to do this but figured the /etc/sysctl.d/20-quiet-printk.conf is empty there is nothing that I can add to it. I added kernel.printk = 3 3 3 3 to the line still no sucess. Any Suggestions??

  • how about this:
    quiet vga=current
    I’m not sure if you saw this but I came across this:

    If you are still getting messages printed to the console, it may be dmesg sending you what it thinks are important messages. You can change the level at which these messages will be printed by using quiet loglevel=<level>, where <level> is any number between 0 and 7, where 0 is the most critical, and 7 is debug levels of printing.
    

    Silent Boot

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  • So this is what I put on the first line and still didn’t work. Correct me if I did something wrong.

    #quiet loglevel=3 vga=current

    Do I have to use the grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg for it to work?

  • A system may boot in two different ways:

    1. Some modules, services, programs, drivers, etc. don’t load cleanly and issue error or warning messages during boot

    2. System boots without errors and warnings

    Even when a system boots cleanly - the 2nd case - still a lot of information messages are displayed. They have the [ OK ] some text… form.

    When some software fails during boot - the 1st case, - the corresponding errors or warnings are mixed in with the normal [ OK ] some text… messages.

    There are two ways to reduce the number of errors and warnings on the 1st case:

    • fix all issues and make the software load properly

    • ignore software errors and, as @Modisc suggests, play with loglevel= parameter to hide the errors

    To reduce the number of information [ OK ] some text… messages - the 2nd case, - there are also two methods:

    • use the quiet parameter - it drastically reduces the number of info messages, but doesn’t hide them all

    • along with quiet, use also the splash parameter - it hides those few info messages that quiet doesn’t hide

    Example. My systems don’t display errors and warnings during boot. All software loads properly. It’s the 2nd scenery, clean boot.

    Without quiet splash a one or one and a half of screen are filled in with [ OK ] some text… info messages.

    To get rid of them, I use quiet splash. In this case - the system loads cleanly, without errors - only two lines of text are displayed:

    starting version 232
    asm: clean; 2423632/1281120 files, 2123632/5120000 blocks
    

    The first line is displayed by systemd. It cannot be removed.

    The second line is displayed by fsck, which checks the / file system for errors before it gets mounted, and reports its state. It can be removed by disabling the file system check in fstab - a bad choice.

    If a system boots cleanly - the 2nd case - the systemd and fsck lines may by hidden by using plymouth.

    If a system doesn’t boot cleanly - the 1st case, - then using plymouth is useless. Plymouth theme will be interrupted and error or warning messages will be still displayed on the text screen.

  • @just Are you willing to share your GRUB lines to have only the system and fsck lines at boot?

  • @bartatantergos said in Silent Boot?:

    @just Are you willing to share your GRUB lines to have only the system and fsck lines at boot?

    Yes, sure, I’ll do that. But it cannot be simply copy-pasted and will require some elaboration on your side, because:

    • I use Grub, not Grub 2 bloatware
    • fsck is controlled by fstab, not by kernel parameters
    • it works when a system boots cleanly, i.e., only with info messages and without error and warning messages

    This is how Grub boots Antergoses here; the full content of my menu-antergos.lst file:

    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    timeout 10
    color black/cyan yellow/cyan
    gfxmenu (hd0,0)/boot/message
    default 0
    
    
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    title  antergos 17.3 gnome (sda8)
    kernel (hd0,7)/boot/vmlinuz-linux showopts root=/dev/sda8 rw resume=/dev/sda3 vga=895 quiet splash modprobe.blacklist=nouveau rcutree.rcu_idle_gp_delay=1
    initrd (hd0,7)/boot/initramfs-linux.img
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    title  antergos 17.3 mate (sda9)
    kernel (hd0,8)/boot/vmlinuz-linux showopts root=/dev/sda9 rw resume=/dev/sda3 vga=895 quiet splash modprobe.blacklist=nouveau rcutree.rcu_idle_gp_delay=1
    initrd (hd0,8)/boot/initramfs-linux.img
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    title  antergos 17.3 cinnamon (sda10)
    kernel (hd0,9)/boot/vmlinuz-linux showopts root=/dev/sda10 rw resume=/dev/sda3 vga=895 quiet splash modprobe.blacklist=nouveau rcutree.rcu_idle_gp_delay=1
    initrd (hd0,9)/boot/initramfs-linux.img
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    title  antergos 17.3 plasma (sda11)
    kernel (hd0,10)/boot/vmlinuz-linux showopts root=/dev/sda11 rw resume=/dev/sda3 vga=895 quiet splash modprobe.blacklist=nouveau rcutree.rcu_idle_gp_delay=1
    initrd (hd0,10)/boot/initramfs-linux.img
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    title --back--
    configfile (hd0,0)/boot/grub/menu.lst
    kernel dummy back to main menu
    
    
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #--title  antetest 17.5 gnome testing (sdb8)
    #--kernel (hd1,7)/boot/vmlinuz-linux showopts root=/dev/sdb8 rw resume=/dev/sda3 vga=895 quiet splash modprobe.blacklist=nouveau rcutree.rcu_idle_gp_delay=1
    #--initrd (hd1,7)/boot/initramfs-linux.img
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #--title  antetest 17.5 mate testing (sdb9)
    #--kernel (hd1,8)/boot/vmlinuz-linux showopts root=/dev/sdb9 rw resume=/dev/sda3 vga=895 quiet splash modprobe.blacklist=nouveau rcutree.rcu_idle_gp_delay=1
    #--initrd (hd1,8)/boot/initramfs-linux.img
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #--title  antetest 17.5 cinnamon testing (sdb10)
    #--kernel (hd1,9)/boot/vmlinuz-linux showopts root=/dev/sdb10 rw resume=/dev/sda3 vga=895 quiet splash modprobe.blacklist=nouveau rcutree.rcu_idle_gp_delay=1
    #--initrd (hd1,9)/boot/initramfs-linux.img
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #--title  antetest 17.5 plasma testing (sdb11)
    #--kernel (hd1,10)/boot/vmlinuz-linux showopts root=/dev/sdb11 rw resume=/dev/sda3 vga=895 quiet splash modprobe.blacklist=nouveau rcutree.rcu_idle_gp_delay=1
    #--initrd (hd1,10)/boot/initramfs-linux.img
    
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #--title --back--
    #--configfile (hd0,0)/boot/grub/menu.lst
    #--kernel dummy back to main menu
    

    What may be interesting for you here is the presence of two boot parameters - quiet and splash.

    Most probably your Grub 2 already has these two parameters. If not, simply add them to the Grub 2 boot line.

    Statically mounted file systems are checked for errors - before they get mounted - not by initramfs or kernel, but thru one of parameters in the fstab file.

    This is the full content of Antergos 17.3 Mate fstab - the 2nd entry in the menu above, on sda9:

    #
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information
    #
    # <file system>  <dir>  <type>  <options>  <dump>  <pass>
    
    /dev/sda9   /     ext4  rw,relatime,data=ordered  0 1
    /dev/sda16  /1st  ext4  rw,relatime,data=ordered  0 2
    /dev/sdb16  /2nd  ext4  rw,relatime,data=ordered  0 2
    /dev/sda3   none  swap  defaults                  0 0
    /dev/sdb3   none  swap  defaults                  0 0
    

    Fsck behaviour is defined by the last, 6th parameter. The <pass> column. It may have only 3 values:

    • 0 - do not check a file system
    • 1 - the first file system to check, prior to all other checks
    • 2 - once the file system with <pass> 1 has been checked, proceed with checking this file system(s) too

    In other words, 1 may be present only once. It is your / (root) partition. It is checked in the first place. In the example it is the sda9 partition, where Antergos Mate / (root) lives.

    2 may be present multiple times. The order in which multiple file system are checked, is not defined. No info messages are displayed for this check. In the example these are sda16 and sdb16 partitions. These two are huge data partitions, shared between all Linuxes installed on the computer. I keep there all my data (user) files, and I want file systems on them to be clean and without errors.

    Again, most probably your root file system already has the ,pass> set to 1 in fstab.

    This ensures a very silent boot here. Not because of these parameters, but mainly thanks to the fact that no software fails to load on boot. Thus, doesn’t display any error or warning messages.

  • @just Thanks again, for a clear explanation.
    Will not copy but check all this out.

  • @just I’ll definitely check that out.

  • I did it. All I did was go to the /boot/grub/grub.cfg added splash log level=3 vga=current after quiet on all the Linux line.

  • @ripsider said in Silent Boot?:

    I did it.

    So now you have only two lines during boot, similar to these ? :

    starting version 232
    asm: clean; 2423632/1281120 files, 2123632/5120000 blocks
    
  • @just Yeah and thanks for the help!!

silent2 boot147 Posts 11Views 372
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