• \[SOLVED\] boot times and modemmanager.service


    Hello everyone,
    I’ve been going over my boot times and I noticed that modemmanager.service is taking nearly six seconds to start during which it is stopping everything else from loading. Isn’t modemmanager for mobile connections? If I’m on a wired connection can I just disable that service? Will networkmanager.service work properly if I disable modemmanager? Also, UFW is taking almost 7 seconds to start up. Is that a reasonable time for that service? Thanks in advance for the help and insight.

  • Hello everyone,
    I’ve been going over my boot times and I noticed that modemmanager.service is taking nearly six seconds to start during which it is stopping everything else from loading. Isn’t modemmanager for mobile connections? If I’m on a wired connection can I just disable that service? Will networkmanager.service work properly if I disable modemmanager? Also, UFW is taking almost 7 seconds to start up. Is that a reasonable time for that service? Thanks in advance for the help and insight.

  • You won’t need modemmanager if you

    don’t have a 3G/4G/UMTS connection (usb dongle, built in sim card slot etc)
    don’t connect to the internet through bluetooth tethering etc.

    If you just use WLAN/LAN connection, you should be safe disabling it.

    sudo systemctl stop ModemManager.service
    sudo systemctl disable ModemManager.service

    Note that after disabling modemmanager, networkmanager will spam your system log with warnings.
    You can ignore them.

    cheers

    Please give a feedback after you get help so the thread can be set to solved.

  • I disabled the service but it didn’t seem to affect the overall boot time. Oh well I will just be happy with a 15 - 20 second boot time. Thanks for the help!

  • Hi,

    Both modem manager and UFW will not start until your network connection is ready. The boot time shown reflects the time they are “waiting” for your connection to come up.

    Cheers!

  • If so, you should get a static IP. Maybe it takes long to get an IP through DHCP.
    I never had any boot time delay or similar problems. Additionally I told my router to always give the same IP to my network controllers MAC. Things are going pretty fast this way.

    Please give a feedback after you get help so the thread can be set to solved.

  • My guess is that you are getting the best boot time possible for your hardware. I could be wrong though. What’s your system specs?

  • Well right now my boot time is pretty good, even tho my hardware isn’t that new.

    Got an Acer 7738G with
    Core2Duo P7550 @ 2.26G
    4G DDR3 RAM

    But the best job does the Crucial SSD I built in some months ago.

    I feel like setting a static IP sped things up even with my old HDD.

    Please give a feedback after you get help so the thread can be set to solved.

  • hehe…i was referring to the OP and his boot time question

  • My computer is a little old, running a quad core core 2 duo with six gigs of ram, Nvidia gtx 660 (Nvidia drivers) and standard bios setup (no eufi boot). I may be getting about as good as it gets with my system. I will try setting a static IP in the morning and see if that changes anything.

  • I set up a static IP using the info on the Arch wiki ([url:3ag2z492]https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Network_configuration#Static_IP_address[/url:3ag2z492]) and it did cut down boot time by a few seconds but that is all. I think I will leave things be for now, linux still boots faster than win7 ever did.

  • That’s some good news. But why did you make it so complicated?
    Just get in your Network Manager and switch from DHCP to manual and add the IP. That’s all

    Please give a feedback after you get help so the thread can be set to solved.

  • lol I didn’t even see the properties button in the network manager app, need to slow down and look more I guess. Oh well I learned how to do it the hard way I guess.

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