• Like 0

    Watchdog did not stop


    Frequently, at shutting off, I get the warning that watchdog didn’t stop or end, something like that. I’ve read that it is just a harmless warning and indeed my laptop shuts off right after the message.
    Is there something I can do to prevent it, because it’s a warning in the first place?

  • Like 1

    @bpoerwo said in Watchdog did not stop:

    Frequently, at shutting off, I get the warning that watchdog didn’t stop or end, something like that. I’ve read that it is just a harmless warning and indeed my laptop shuts off right after the message.

    It’s not even a warning. It’s just a kind of info only. And it’s normal that it is displayed.

    Is there something I can do to prevent it, because it’s a warning in the first place?

    Yes, there is, if you wish. Edit /etc/systemd/system.conf, and:

    • uncomment 2 lines:

      ...
      #RuntimeWatchdogSec=0
      #ShutdownWatchdogSec=10min
      ...
      
    • leave RuntimeWatchdogSec at 0

    • set ShutdownWatchdogSec to 0

    • like here

      ...
      RuntimeWatchdogSec=0
      ShutdownWatchdogSec=0
      ...
      
    • reboot

    • done

  • Like 0

    Thank you, I couldn’t edit it, because acces was denied. Which is strange, because I’m the only user on the machine.
    On monday I will have a new laptop and then I will try it again, otherwise I will not worry about it.

  • Like 0

    @bpoerwo said in Watchdog did not stop:

    Thank you, I couldn’t edit it, because acces was denied. Which is strange, because I’m the only user on the machine.

    No, it’s not strange. You are not the only user on a computer.

    Every Linux has at least two users - root user (administrator) and a regular user (you). The root user is created automatically and cannot be changed or modified in any way. Regular user(s) are created during install, and may be added, deleted, modified later.

    Root user can access and modify all files in the file system. It is dangerous - root can destroy any Linux in one second. Root has the highest level of permissions. It can do everything, everywhere.

    Regular user can access and modify only his | her own files and nothing else on the disk. These files are stored in the ~/ folder. It is called “user’s home folder”. A regular user has a regular level of permissions, and cannot seriously damage a Linux. Users’ home folders are physically stored in the /home/username directories.

    A regular user can temporarily gain root’s privilegies and damage a system any way he wants. It is done by using su, sudo, ssx, pkexec, gksu, kdesu command prefixes.

    /etc/systemd/system.conf file is out of a regular user space. It can be modifide only by root. For example, run in terminal:

    sudo geany /etc/systemd/system.conf
    

    Use a text editor installed in your system instead of geany. Do not close the terminal window until the modified file is saved and text editor’s window is closed. Wait until bash prompt returns in terminal.

    On monday I will have a new laptop and then I will try it again, otherwise I will not worry about it.

    Nothing will change on a new laptop. Access rights in Linux don’t depend on hardware. It’s better to not modify system files, and leave /etc/systemd/system.conf as it is, with default content.

  • Like 0

    Thank you again, for your clear answer.
    In hindside, I knew about the root account, but it just didn’t come up to me to use it. When I used Manjaro, I used it twice to make the system work again.
    With the new laptop remark, I just meant that I don’t want to invest more time in this laptop, because it’s showing its age. (fans are running constantly on high spin, making them noisy, the graphics card glitches once in a while)
    Now I know that the watchdog line isn’t a warning or an error, I just leave it like that.

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