• Like 3

    ca-certificates-utils-20170307-1-upgrade-requires-manual-intervention


    Hi

    Archlinux announcements:

    The upgrade to ca-certificates-utils 20170307-1 requires manual intervention because a symlink which used to be generated post-install has been moved into the package proper.

    As deleting the symlink may leave you unable to download packages, perform this upgrade in three steps:

    # pacman -Syuw                           # download packages
    # rm /etc/ssl/certs/ca-certificates.crt  # remove conflicting file
    # pacman -Su                             # perform upgrade
    

    https://www.archlinux.org/news/ca-certificates-utils-20170307-1-upgrade-requires-manual-intervention/

    Regards.

  • Like 0

    Is it safe to remove certificates? I mean, will they be reinstalled after that procedure?
    I’m not very confidant to remove, neither to risk updating my system now…

    Antergos (default OS) - WIN10 (abandoned)
    MATE desktop
    AMD - A4 7300 Radeon graphics
    16 GB ram
    HD 1 TB

  • Like 7

    @fernandomaroto said in ca-certificates-utils-20170307-1-upgrade-requires-manual-intervention:

    Is it safe to remove certificates? I mean, will they be reinstalled after that procedure?

    Yes, it’s safe - as far as the system is upgraded asap right after the removal. Certificates will be installed back again. It is done by the last, third command.

    I’m not very confidant to remove, neither to risk updating my system now…

    If you’re as lazy as myself to type in redundant commands, those three commands may be reduced to one only:

    sudo pacman -Syu --force
    

    The command will simply overwrite existing /etc/ssl/certs/ca-certificates.crt with the new one during upgrade.

  • Like 0

    @just thanks, everything went fine :+1:

    Antergos (default OS) - WIN10 (abandoned)
    MATE desktop
    AMD - A4 7300 Radeon graphics
    16 GB ram
    HD 1 TB

  • Like 0

    Thank you, I tried to upgrade and got an error, so the first place I checked was the forum and it rewarded me with the solution.

  • Like 0

    Hi,
    I’m a complete newbie at arch, so forgive my stupid question. I followed the instruction, but nothing happens in the terminal. It isn’t the first time I’m using a terminal, but after the first step there’s nothing, no action or error message.
    What am I doing wrong?

  • Like 0

    @bpoerwo

    Hi

    If your installation is after March 7th , you don’t need to do anything.

    Pacman will warn you, dont worry.
    You’re not doing anything wrong.

    There aren’t stupid questions :+1:

    Regards.

  • Like 0

    Thanks for the quick respond.:+1:

  • Like 0

    @just Hope someone can help. I used the sudo pacman -Syu --force & everything seemed to be ok but I have a problem now with Wine / POL. Two games I play regularly have issues. One is just black screen & the other opens but moving mouse to right or down moves screen revealing my desktop underneath.

    I did see a message on the update that said something about graphics but I didn’t pay enough attention (my bad I know) It said something about running something at reboot I think

  • Like 0

    @Uzi said in ca-certificates-utils-20170307-1-upgrade-requires-manual-intervention:


    I did see a message on the update that said something about graphics but I didn’t pay enough attention (my bad I know) It said something about running something at reboot I think

    As one of our fairy tales says: “Go there don’t know where, bring me that don’t know what.” :) . It’s hard to translate.

    As a first thing, I’d suggest to search the pacman’s log for error and warning messages. Pacman keeps everything it has done in the /var/log/pacman.log. It’s a huge text file.

    This way you could find the old messages to which you didn’t pay enough attention during upgrade.

    To not go crazy by looking it up by hand, it’s possible to use two system logs viewers:

    • gnome-system-log (horrible Gtk3 tool for Gnome, Cinnamon, probably Mate)
    • ksystemlog (beautiful tool for Plasma)

    Both permit to comfortably search for everything we wish.

    As a second thing, you could trace a program’s executioan in real time. Tail the system log (journalctl -ef) in one terrminal and launch the program from another terminal. In the 1st terminal you’ll see all system messages while they are going to the system log. This way you could catch eventual errors in real time.

    But it works well for windowed apps, and may be less suitable for full screen apps.

  • Like 0

    @just Great pointer to the log. Message was:-

    If you run into trouble with CUDA not being available, run nvidia-modprobe first.

    It didn’t catch my eye fully because I had never heard of Cuda but I did register the Nvidia part.

    Just searched & cant find how to run nvidia-modprobe.

  • Like 0

    @Uzi said in ca-certificates-utils-20170307-1-upgrade-requires-manual-intervention:


    If you run into trouble with CUDA not being available, run nvidia-modprobe first.

    If your Nvidia is not CUDA - CUDA is a parallel computing on CPU and GPU, - then this message may be safely ignored.

    For example, none of my three Nvidia’s is CUDA, the message pops up from time to time during upgrades, I simply ignore it. It lasts for years, nothing breaks.

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