• Possible Fix: Antergos & UEFI Boot Installation Failure


    Hi everyone.

    This issue plagued me for the entirety of a week and having solved it on my own (because nothing else worked), I am finally at ease while still being puzzled.

    So the fix is this: INSTALL USING THE NORMAL NON-UEFI BOOT

    MY STORY – TL;DR

    Now, let me explain:

    I currently have Windows 10 installed on a MBR/BiOS Partition Table because Windows 10 will just not allow me to use a GPT/GUID Partition Table (I’ve tried instructions from… everywhere. Mainly the Arch Wiki). :/

    I even went as far as installing just Antergos (UEFI Boot Install) expecting that things would work and I can just come back to a dual boot system after a few months. You guessed it! After I finished installing, Antergos would not boot giving me an error about there being no grub installation to boot from. I then went and did a fresh install of grub (using the same LiveUSB that performed the installtion) to the “supposed boot partition” and rebooted thinking “Oh please! Easy fix.”. Same damn error… -_-

    This brought me to the the forums (Arch, Antergos & Manjaro) & Arch Wiki and I tried “every trick in the bookrelevant to my machine. Nothing worked and after the 3rd day, I just said “Screw it! LinuxMint is where I’m going for now.”. Rinse… and repeat. - UEFI Boot on Live USB / DVD (I tried wasted 2 DVDs) just does not work.

    So finally, I installed Windows 10 and left 125 GBs of unallocated space for an Arch-based Distro to be installed when a fix comes out. After doing all my Windows updates, I decided to try again, this time I decided that I would, on a whim, try the non-UEFI / normal boot from Live USB option (using LinuxMint at the time). Voilà! Here I am typing this up (from my Manjaro KDE installation) to post on all the forums I am apart of.

    NB: I’m noticing fixes are finally popping up on both Antergos & Manjaro threads for this issue. FINALLY

    Add. NB: I do not think this is a MBR / GPT issue but that of a kernel issue. The reason I believe it is kernel-based is that during all this, I was able to install OpenSUSE 12.3 using the UEFI Boot mode from an old DVD I have had since that version of OpenSUSE was released (2013).

    Add.++ NB: I tried the following Distros with UEFI Boot and failed: Antergos, Manjaro, LinuxMint & Apricity. The only Distro that worked OOTB was KaOSx.

    PS: I don’t mind being corrected or even scrutinised for this post. This was “my fix” and I hope it works for everyone who have yet to find something that works.

  • It usually is advised to use the non-UEFI option wherever possible.
    However, I have tried both options and been able to get a working installation through both the UEFI & non-UEFI boot options.
    The kernels & drivers are quite dependent on the machine you are working with and the type of hardware that is built in.

    And yes, it rarely is a straight forward process, and does require some (lots at times… lol) amount of tweaking to get things working absolutely fine. It is worth the effort though at the end of the
    day.

    Glad you got things working.
    Would advise you to do a CloneZIlla of your fully working installation, so you have some kind of backup to jump back to when SHTF, which is very likely on a rolling distro :)

    PS: I have tried many distros and each has worked with different levels of compatibility on my machine. I can safely state that with Antergos now I have everything working the way I want it to.
    KAos was one distro that would not even boot into LiveCD session try what i might… go figure :)

  • @lmdz

    Rod’s Books gives in-depth information on UEFI

    Rod has developed rEFInd (which is in Arch’s repository) - Arch-wiki entry rEFInd states:
    rEFInd is a UEFI boot manager capable of launching EFISTUB kernels. It is a fork of the no-longer-maintained rEFIt and fixes many issues with respect to non-Mac UEFI booting. It is designed to be platform-neutral and to simplify booting multiple OSes.

  • @kwacka I am using refind atm. It is a life saver.

  • @lmdz said in Possible Fix: Antergos & UEFI Boot Installation Failure:

    It usually is advised to use the non-UEFI option wherever possible.

    For some reason I remember reading that I should use the UEFI-Boot to get things to work. Maybe I misread or was just following the wrong set of instructions. :confused:

    The kernels & drivers are quite dependent on the machine you are working with and the type of hardware that is built in.

    I understand the the kernel unlikely the problem but I just found it weird that a Distro version from 3 years ago had no problem whatsoever. Maybe it’s Grub? Or the installers: Cnchi, Thus, Calamries and whatever LinuxMint uses?

    And yes, it rarely is a straight forward process, and does require some (lots at times… lol) amount of tweaking to get things working absolutely fine. It is worth the effort though at the end of the
    day.

    Certainly worth the effort. I Love :heart: Arch-Based Distros that teach me more each day and help me to get things done. :smile:

    Glad you got things working.
    Would advise you to do a CloneZIlla of your fully working installation, so you have some kind of backup to jump back to when SHTF, which is very likely on a rolling distro :)

    For me, it’s unlikely. Reason is that I wait a few days before each update. Even so, I might take your advice on that. :thought_balloon:

    PS: I have tried many distros and each has worked with different levels of compatibility on my machine. I can safely state that with Antergos now I have everything working the way I want it to.
    KAos was one distro that would not even boot into LiveCD session try what i might… go figure :)

    Lol. I only tried it because it is technically Arch-based. Will follow it’s development. ::train:

  • @kwacka said in Possible Fix: Antergos & UEFI Boot Installation Failure:

    Rod’s Books

    Took a quick scan of the purpose of rEFInd. Not sure it would help me in the case where my boot-loader just did not install in the 1st place. I did not mention it specifically but, the boot-loader not installing was only my main problem. The other problems were,

    • not enough space,
    • couldn’t finish installing "X",
    • reboot and find that my x-server wasn’t loading (or missing), etc.

    As I said, I had to try “every trick in the book”.

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