• clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop?


    Is it possible to clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop without to much problems and fix to do? Possible and easy with MacOS, but i want to maintain a dual boot MacoS plus Antergos laptop and a single boot Antergos laptop in an easy and same way.

    In such a way that the two laptops have always the same system, DE and application version and settings. The hardware from the two laptops is almost the same except there are 4-5 years in between them.

    If not possible; What’s the easy and fast way to export all system, DE and application settings and import all that in the other Antergos laptop?

  • @bartatantergos said in clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop?:

    Is it possible to clone an entire Antergos system…

    Yes, it is.

    It is possible to clone not only Antergos, but any system. By backing up partitions on source computer, and restoring them on destination computer.

    Partitions backup and restore are easily done with fsarchiver. This incredibly useful and powerful utility is present in all Linux distros.

    An example.

    Let’s assume that Antergos occupies sda6, sda16 and sdb16 partitions on the source computer. All Antergos partitions are listed in /etc/fstab. There’s no need to clone linux-swap partition(s).

    You want to clone them to sda2, sdb12 and sdb14 partitions on the destination computer. There is an external /dev/sdc disk with /backup folder on it (though it may be any folder in any existing OS).

    Backup source Antergos partitions:

    sudo ionice fsarchiver savefs -v -j8 -z7 /dev/sdc/backup/20160808-1400-sda6-sda16-sdb16-only-OldAntergos /dev/sda6 /dev/sda16 /dev/sdb16 && sync && sleep 4 && sync && sleep 4 && shutdown -h now
    

    Restore Antergos partitions on destination computer, changing partitions:

    sudo ionice fsarchiver restfs -v -j8 /dev/sdc/backup/20160808-1400-sda6-sda16-sdb16-only-OldAntergos.fsa id=0,dest=/dev/sda2 id=1,dest=/dev/sdb12 id=2,dest=/dev/sdb14 && sync && sleep 4 && sync && sleep 4 && shutdown -h now
    

    Destination partitions sizes don’t matter. They may be of the same size as source partitions, bigger or even smaller. Just remember that any Linux should have at least 25% of free disk space to breath freely and feel itself in good health.

    None of backed up and restored partitions should be mounted. Boot into any other Linux existing on source and destination computers. If there’s no other Linux, use Antergos LiveMedia (DVD, USB) or SystemRescueCD.

    Good luck.

  • @just: Thanks, that looks promising! Will test soon and write my experience.
    But what about the boot/EFI folders in the EFI partition?
    Best to clone that hidden partition also or better to rebuild the boot/EFI folders on the destination computer?

  • @bartatantergos said in clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop?:


    But what about the boot/EFI folders in the EFI partition?

    Oops! Sorry, didn’t think about it.

    UEFI is disabled forever on all my computers, there’s no Winz, no GPT, no Grub 2, nowhere. Linux doesn’t need that diabolic things.

    Sincerely, I have no idea how to treat efi partition. Mea culpa.

  • @just: I don’t understand. Almost everywhere is written to install boot/EFI (on UEFI machines) and for sure Grub. MacOS creates the EFI partition automatic, but it seams it doesn’t use that either. So, is it possible to run dual boot MacOS and Antergos without EFI and GRUB?

    What’s your boot loader then?
    Why do you call it “diabolic things”? :-)

  • @bartatantergos said in clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop?:

    @just: I don’t understand. Almost everywhere is written to install boot/EFI (on UEFI machines)

    I can’t speak about Macs, as I never had one. Once Windowz is removed, UEFI may be disabled (switched off) on traditional computers.

    and for sure Grub.

    Yes, sure. Grub 1 (Legacy) is the excellent boot loader. Grub 2 is not as good as Grub 1.

    MacOS creates the EFI partition automatic, but it seams it doesn’t use that either.

    Without Mac and without Windowz can’t make any assumptions on the matter.

    So, is it possible to run dual boot MacOS and Antergos without EFI and GRUB?

    IIRC, there were positive reports about successful Antergos installation on Mac.

    What’s your boot loader then?

    Only Grub 1, aka Grub Legacy. It successfully boots 26 Linuxes on this computer, without any problem. os-prober script from Grub 2 takes 8 hours to find them all. The horrible generated Grub 2 menu is unusable.

    Why do you call it “diabolic things”? :-)

    Because they were invented by Microsoft to suppress the use of any OS different from Winz :) .

  • @just : That’s a lot to check out and try! A few questions more to understand better:

    Yes, sure. Grub 1 (Legacy) is the excellent boot loader. Grub 2 is not as good as Grub 1.

    Why is there then only the possibility to install GRUB2 or Systemd?

    IIRC, there were positive reports about successful Antergos installation on Mac.

    I run Antergos in dual boot on a MacBook Pro and Antergos on a other MBP, but both with Grub 2.
    Does Grub 1 has less steps to boot then Grub 2?

    When i boot Antergos i get first to see 4 different flashing screens before getting into the login screen. Then i have still to go thru 3 different login screens to login.
    That’s the only disturbing thing in Antergos.
    Will Grub 1 simplify this or are there tricks to simplify this? (Maybe new topic?)

  • @bartatantergos said in clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop?:


    Does Grub 1 has less steps to boot then Grub 2?

    The question is not quite correct. Any boot loader has one step only - transfer the control from initial startup sector to an OS.

    In case of Grub 1 the initial startup sector is found in first 512 bytes of a disk, in Master Boot Record. BIOS (Legacy, not UEFI) reads this sector. It holds initial Grub 1 part. Then Grub 1 continues to work on a partition, defined as root during Grub 1 installation. When Grub, either 1 or 2, presents its menu, it already has finished to work.

    When i boot Antergos i get first to see 4 different flashing screens before getting into the login screen. Then i have still to go thru 3 different login screens to login.

    There are no any flashing screens here. I notice only two text lines on the black screen:

    • starting version NNN (from systemd)
    • the message from fsck informing that the root partition is clean

    After that the system starts - I use autologin.

    That’s the only disturbing thing in Antergos.
    Will Grub 1 simplify this or are there tricks to simplify this? (Maybe new topic?)

    I don’t think it depends on a boot loader. More likely it depends on Mac hardware. But I don’t know it, so can’t speak about it.

    Finally, I think it’s almost impossible to find Grub 1 nowdays. Mine is from 1998. I install it by hand.

  • @just said in clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop?:

    @bartatantergos said in clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop?:


    Does Grub 1 has less steps to boot then Grub 2?

    The question is not quite correct. Any boot loader has one step only - transfer the control from initial startup sector to an OS.

    I know, i mean not step but flashing screens. English isn’t my main languages as you notice.

    In case of Grub 1 the initial startup sector is found in first 512 bytes of a disk, in Master Boot Record. BIOS (Legacy, not UEFI) reads this sector. It holds initial Grub 1 part. Then Grub 1 continues to work on a partition, defined as root during Grub 1 installation. When Grub, either 1 or 2, presents its menu, it already has finished to work.

    Thanks, to clear this out.

    When i boot Antergos i get first to see 4 different flashing screens before getting into the login screen. Then i have still to go thru 3 different login screens to login.

    There are no any flashing screens here. I notice only two text lines on the black screen:

    • starting version NNN (from systemd)
    • the message from fsck informing that the root partition is clean

    After that the system starts - I use autologin.

    This evening i will try to make pictures of all flashing screens and login screens and post it here. Maybe somebody with a Mac can help on this.

    That’s the only disturbing thing in Antergos.
    Will Grub 1 simplify this or are there tricks to simplify this? (Maybe new topic?)

    I don’t think it depends on a boot loader. More likely it depends on Mac hardware. But I don’t know it, so can’t speak about it.

    The Mac Hardware in combination with Linux and Antergos then.
    MacOS and El Capitan for sure starts in 4 seconds and 1 screen, the login user screen.
    I think it has more to do where the boot loader is installed, and the settings from the bootloader. I have to investigate that more intensively, only problem is that i am not an ICT men, but more a designer/small developer. :-) So, it takes for me at least 4 times the time.
    Does somebody now more about Linux/boot loaders/Mac hardware/boot time?

    Finally, I think it’s almost impossible to find Grub 1 nowdays. Mine is from 1998. I install it by hand.

    Too dangerous for me to touch an old treasure like that! :-)

  • @just : Two questions more before i start testing this:
    Why is there two time:

    && sync && sleep 4
    

    With all “system” your mean fsarchiver will work also with MacOS X?

  • @bartatantergos said in clone an entire Antergos system to an other older laptop?:

    @just : Two questions more before i start testing this:
    Why is there two time:

    && sync && sleep 4
    

    Just repeated twice for double-security :) . The 2nd occurence may be safely omitted. Actually, it is not needed.

    With all “system” your mean fsarchiver will work also with MacOS X?

    You don’t quote the context. Can’t figure out what are you referrring to.

    Anyway, fsarchiver works both with single directory(-ies) and entire partitions. I use mostly the second option - backup an entire partitoin(s). If the system occupies more than 1 partition, I include them all in a single backup.

    Again, I know almost nothing about Mac and OS X. But. If you boot the computer from any Linux (which has gparted and fsarchiver), and gparted can “see” and “understand” the OS X partition, then most probably fsarchiver will be able to backup and restore it.

    Fsarchiver works with all standard Linux and Winz file systems known to parted, from fat16 to ext4. Not sure about btrfs, I don’t use it.

    Read more at fsarchiver home page here.

    Regards

  • Thinking better, I doubt that fsarchiver will be able to backup OS X partition.

    Differently from clonezilla, which may do a bit-by-bit disk backup, independently from any file system existing on the disk, fsarchiver must be able to read the files in a partition. I doubt that fsarchiver is able to read NFS file system (if OS X still uses that).

    For example, when I get a new computer from a store with Winz 7 | 8 | 10 on it, the first thing I do is the whole disk backup with clonezilla. Then wipe out all disk content. Clonezilla creates an exact disk copy, at a bit-by-bit level. It allows to restore the disk to the factory settings at any moment.

    On the other hand, when I need to clone any existing Linux from one to same or another computer, to other partitions, with different sizes, I use fsarchiver.

    Clonezilla are fsarchiver are reciprocally complementary. Each one has its pro and cons. Each one can do the things impossible in another one.

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