• Unable to boot Antergos installation on XPS 15


    I have a Dell XPS 15 9550 (the most recent model), and I was able to get through the install process with minimal issues (I had to ‘modprobe bcrmfmac’ to get WiFi, which is required for install, but that was the only caveat). Since this laptop has an NVMe SSD, I can’t use GRUB, so I installed with systemd, with a dedicated /boot partition separate from my Windows bootloader.

    But I can’t boot into Antergos. There’s no specific error message, either. I just select “Antergos” from the bootloader, a few lines of text quickly flash on the screen, and then it goes to black, with a single white cursor. And that’s it, it just sits there.

    Things I’ve tried:
    Booting without “quiet” in an attempt to get some information, but I still get a black screen with just a cursor
    Booting with “nomodeset,” nothing changes
    Booting with “modprobe=bcrmfmac” (and I’m not even sure I’m using proper syntax here), no luck.

    Is this type of boot issue known? Is there something I can do to fix it?

    Thanks.

  • Hi!
    Are these any relevant?
    “What you have to do when the option for “Antergos USB” pops up do not select it. Instead scroll up using arrow keys to the option that says “Antergos CD/DVD” and select that instead. It should be the option right above the default selection on the screen when the live USB first boots up”.
    https://forum.antergos.com/topic/4074/antergos-uefi-usb-install-fails/4

    " Set Boot Sequence to UEFI?
    Set Advance Boot Options to allow Legacy Options ROM’s AND ensured UEFI Network Stack is disabled?
    Set SATA Operation to AHCI?
    Disabled Secure Boot?
    Set POST Behavior Fast Boot to Minimal?"
    https://forum.antergos.com/topic/4119/dell-xps-13-9350-installation-issues/4

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • Hey, thanks for the reply.

    As for the first solution, that’s actually what you must do to boot from the USB to get into the live distribution, not the installation. And for the second solution, I’ve gone into my BIOS to ensure all of those settings are how they are supposed to be. As it turns out, they were all already at those settings, so that being said, something else is keeping me from booting.

    Are there any kernel boot parameters I can try, or something of the like?

  • @ubergeek77

    As for the first solution, that’s actually what you must do to boot from the USB to get into the live distribution, not the installation

    One should be more concentrated when answering, sorry about this.:astonished:
    Coming to your issue, I hope somebody knows the answer. Bleeding edge hardware, uncharted waters. This might be helpful if you haven t already been through.
    https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=204739
    Best of luck!

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • @anarch

    I think the easiest solution might just be to use grub-git, which is on AUR, and has full support for NVMe drives. The current version of grub packaged with Antergos (or at least the stable isos) does not have support for my SSD. Would it be possible for me to just install grub-git on the live USB and replace the current version before attempting to install? Or is there any simpler way for me to install Antergos using grub-git?

  • @ubergeek77 said in Unable to boot Antergos installation on XPS 15:

    @anarch

    I think the easiest solution might just be to use grub-git, which is on AUR, and has full support for NVMe drives. The current version of grub packaged with Antergos (or at least the stable isos) does not have support for my SSD. Would it be possible for me to just install grub-git on the live USB and replace the current version before attempting to install? Or is there any simpler way for me to install Antergos using grub-git?

    @karasu ? @lots-0-logs ?

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • This post is deleted!
  • @anarch said in Unable to boot Antergos installation on XPS 15:

    @karasu ? @lots-0-logs ?

    I’m still trying to find a solution. I attempted to replace grub from inside the live environment (before installing Antergos) with grub-git by installing it through yaourt, but that didn’t change my situation. After doing this, nothing failed during the install, but I still boot to the grub recovery shell. Chances are I either didn’t fully replace grub, or something else is going on.

    I also gave installing with systemd another try. Previously, I would boot to a black screen, but text would flash on the screen faster than I could read it. Now, the text stays on the screen, and it might be able to provide insight into what’s going on and how I can fix my install, focussing less on grub and more on the “systemd boots but something is broken” side of things.

    Here’s what it says:
    [ 8.835348] brcmfmac: brcmf_inetaddr_changed: fail to get arp ip in table err:-23
    [ 25.094579] brcmfmac: brcmf_msgbuf_get_pktid: Invalid packet id 650 (not in use)

    I hope that provides some insight. The module above, brcmfmac, is what I needed to modprobe in order to get WiFi working for the installation. But after I did this, everything worked fine. I have no idea why it’s preventing me from booting.

    Just in case it helps, here’s an Arch page for my laptop: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Dell_XPS_13_(2015)

  • @ubergeek77
    anything that you attempt to change from a live install, (being run in RAM), for a persistent install from RAM, will NOT change during the live install because the live install is being run in RAM.
    Nothing is permanent in RAM. When you made an attempt to change Grub to grub-git it, only changed that environment on the live USB. The installer is configured to install the usual defaults for a persistent system. Hence, you didn’t fully replace grub and therefore your hoped for replacement didn’t change.

    Download " antergos-wallpapers-extra " and enjoy community sponsored wallpapers.

    Use the "Linux Beginner Search Engine"

    https://cse.google.com/cse/home?cx=017607476515012185699:b_owgx6xyi0

  • @Modisc I see. Well, I only have two options at this point - I can either find out how to actually get the installer to use grub-git (or install Antergos first, then replace grub manually), or find out why my wifi module is preventing me from booting when I use systemd. I am concerned, however, that even if I get grub working, I’ll still won’t be able to boot due to the brcmfmac issue.

    What to do…

  • You and I have the same Dell laptop.
    Try adding systemd.unit=multi-user.target to kernel parameter.
    or
    try an older version of Antergos. It’ll update soon enough as it’s rolling. Google. Make sure the md5 sums stack up.

    Unless you want to try writing/programming your very own Live Antergos installer, that’s probably the only way to get what you want with regards to ‘grub’.
    Otherwise, either of the above two will do.
    A number of problems are with the newer installers.
    Don’t know why.
    They just are.

    Download " antergos-wallpapers-extra " and enjoy community sponsored wallpapers.

    Use the "Linux Beginner Search Engine"

    https://cse.google.com/cse/home?cx=017607476515012185699:b_owgx6xyi0

  • @ubergeek77

    I just wanted to add this to some information. I don’t know how much further you are interestedin this topic but I am to list it anyways.
    I am just throwing this information out there and I have no clue how to adjust grub to the method you prefer.

    You have the ISO file, correct?
    do this via root:

    mount -o loop -t iso9660 the-antergos-iso-and-version-number-you-downloaded.iso /mnt/ 
    

    Then you will have the option to go into the ISO file for Antergos, check to see if there is a Grub folder and edit to your preferences.
    How to edit Grub so as to use grub-git?
    Sorry, I have no idea. For that, that will require effort on your part.

    Download " antergos-wallpapers-extra " and enjoy community sponsored wallpapers.

    Use the "Linux Beginner Search Engine"

    https://cse.google.com/cse/home?cx=017607476515012185699:b_owgx6xyi0

  • Graphic isssues with nvidia and ati are resolved better with

    modprobe.blacklist=nouveau
    

    That was for the “nomodeset” comment, and a suggestion, couldnt he chroot the installation to change the grub?, Maybe im saying something absurd, Ive been all day looking the Arch Wiki to solve another matter and something sounds to me…

  • @Lancro
    Absolutely he could chroot into the ISO. I am assuming that you mean to chroot while it is done with the mount command.
    But he’ll already have access to it via the mount command.
    It may be only read access prior to that command.
    With chroot, should be a different story.

    If you mean with chroot into the newly installed system while installing with the Live mode, it might be possible. Should just be a simple matter of completing that, downloading what he wants, updating his grub config, Done.

    Download " antergos-wallpapers-extra " and enjoy community sponsored wallpapers.

    Use the "Linux Beginner Search Engine"

    https://cse.google.com/cse/home?cx=017607476515012185699:b_owgx6xyi0

  • After the computer completes the Power-On Self-Test, it will attempt to boot the operating system. If the computer advances past the Dell logo screen and then hangs up attempting to load the operating system, it is most likely a No Boot issue. Following are the best solutions to fix booting issues in Dell XPS Monitors:
    Press and hold the Fn key and then press the power button. This starts the pre-boot testing and will launch ePSA. In case you have a Desktop at the Dell logo screen tap the F12 key to enter One Time Boot Menu and use the arrow keys to highlight Diagnostics and press enter. Some Desktops do not have an F12 key, to access the boot options you have to press the <0> (zero) key at the Dell logo screen. Further reference on ePSA Diagnostics- Dell XPS 15 Manual.

unable33 boot150 installation193 Posts 15Views 2978
Log in to reply