• How to disable auto login


    Hello, when I installed the system, I chose auto login automatically, now I have no idea how to disable auto login, help I’m sorry for this simple question I’m just a new comer

  • Hi. You should mention which DE you are using…

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • In Gnome - System/Users

  • its xfce

  • I solved myself:

    1. go to /etc/group -> delete the username of the autologin group
    2. go to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf and comment out autologin line
  • Does this solution work for plasma 5 also?
    This is my /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf file, which lines should I comment out?

    #
    # General configuration
    #
    # start-default-seat = True to always start one seat if none are defined in the configuration
    # greeter-user = User to run greeter as
    # minimum-display-number = Minimum display number to use for X servers
    # minimum-vt = First VT to run displays on
    # lock-memory = True to prevent memory from being paged to disk
    # user-authority-in-system-dir = True if session authority should be in the system location
    # guest-account-script = Script to be run to setup guest account
    # logind-check-graphical = True to on start seats that are marked as graphical by logind
    # log-directory = Directory to log information to
    # run-directory = Directory to put running state in
    # cache-directory = Directory to cache to
    # sessions-directory = Directory to find sessions
    # remote-sessions-directory = Directory to find remote sessions
    # greeters-directory = Directory to find greeters
    # backup-logs = True to move add a .old suffix to old log files when opening new ones
    #
    [LightDM]
    #start-default-seat=true
    #greeter-user=lightdm
    #minimum-display-number=0
    #minimum-vt=7 # Setting this to a value < 7 implies security issues, see FS#46799
    #lock-memory=true
    #user-authority-in-system-dir=false
    #guest-account-script=guest-account
    #logind-check-graphical=false
    #log-directory=/var/log/lightdm
    run-directory=/run/lightdm
    #cache-directory=/var/cache/lightdm
    #sessions-directory=/usr/share/lightdm/sessions:/usr/share/xsessions:/usr/share/wayland-sessions
    #remote-sessions-directory=/usr/share/lightdm/remote-sessions
    #greeters-directory=/usr/share/lightdm/greeters:/usr/share/xgreeters
    #backup-logs=true
    
    #
    # Seat configuration
    #
    # Seat configuration is matched against the seat name glob in the section, for example:
    # [Seat:*] matches all seats and is applied first.
    # [Seat:seat0] matches the seat named "seat0".
    # [Seat:seat-thin-client*] matches all seats that have names that start with "seat-thin-client".
    #
    # type = Seat type (xlocal, xremote, unity)
    # pam-service = PAM service to use for login
    # pam-autologin-service = PAM service to use for autologin
    # pam-greeter-service = PAM service to use for greeters
    # xserver-command = X server command to run (can also contain arguments e.g. X -special-option)
    # xmir-command = Xmir server command to run (can also contain arguments e.g. Xmir -special-option)
    # xserver-config = Config file to pass to X server
    # xserver-layout = Layout to pass to X server
    # xserver-allow-tcp = True if TCP/IP connections are allowed to this X server
    # xserver-share = True if the X server is shared for both greeter and session
    # xserver-hostname = Hostname of X server (only for type=xremote)
    # xserver-display-number = Display number of X server (only for type=xremote)
    # xdmcp-manager = XDMCP manager to connect to (implies xserver-allow-tcp=true)
    # xdmcp-port = XDMCP UDP/IP port to communicate on
    # xdmcp-key = Authentication key to use for XDM-AUTHENTICATION-1 (stored in keys.conf)
    # unity-compositor-command = Unity compositor command to run (can also contain arguments e.g. unity-system-compositor -special-option)
    # unity-compositor-timeout = Number of seconds to wait for compositor to start
    # greeter-session = Session to load for greeter
    # greeter-hide-users = True to hide the user list
    # greeter-allow-guest = True if the greeter should show a guest login option
    # greeter-show-manual-login = True if the greeter should offer a manual login option
    # greeter-show-remote-login = True if the greeter should offer a remote login option
    # user-session = Session to load for users
    # allow-user-switching = True if allowed to switch users
    # allow-guest = True if guest login is allowed
    # guest-session = Session to load for guests (overrides user-session)
    session-wrapper=/etc/lightdm/Xsession
    # greeter-wrapper = Wrapper script to run greeter with
    # guest-wrapper = Wrapper script to run guest sessions with
    # display-setup-script = Script to run when starting a greeter session (runs as root)
    # display-stopped-script = Script to run after stopping the display server (runs as root)
    # greeter-setup-script = Script to run when starting a greeter (runs as root)
    # session-setup-script = Script to run when starting a user session (runs as root)
    # session-cleanup-script = Script to run when quitting a user session (runs as root)
    # autologin-guest = True to log in as guest by default
    # autologin-user = User to log in with by default (overrides autologin-guest)
    # autologin-user-timeout = Number of seconds to wait before loading default user
    # autologin-session = Session to load for automatic login (overrides user-session)
    # autologin-in-background = True if autologin session should not be immediately activated
    # exit-on-failure = True if the daemon should exit if this seat fails
    #
    [Seat:*]
    #type=xlocal
    #pam-service=lightdm
    #pam-autologin-service=lightdm-autologin
    #pam-greeter-service=lightdm-greeter
    #xserver-command=X
    #xmir-command=Xmir
    #xserver-config=
    #xserver-layout=
    #xserver-allow-tcp=false
    #xserver-share=true
    #xserver-hostname=
    #xserver-display-number=
    #xdmcp-manager=
    #xdmcp-port=177
    #xdmcp-key=
    #unity-compositor-command=unity-system-compositor
    #unity-compositor-timeout=60
    greeter-session=lightdm-webkit2-greeter
    #greeter-hide-users=false
    #greeter-allow-guest=true
    #greeter-show-manual-login=false
    #greeter-show-remote-login=true
    user-session=plasma
    #allow-user-switching=true
    #allow-guest=true
    #guest-session=
    session-wrapper=/etc/lightdm/Xsession
    #greeter-wrapper=
    #guest-wrapper=
    #display-setup-script=
    #display-stopped-script=
    #greeter-setup-script=
    #session-setup-script=
    #session-cleanup-script=
    #autologin-guest=false
    autologin-user=thanasis
    autologin-user-timeout=0
    #autologin-in-background=false
    #autologin-session=
    #exit-on-failure=false
    
    #
    # XDMCP Server configuration
    #
    # enabled = True if XDMCP connections should be allowed
    # port = UDP/IP port to listen for connections on
    # listen-address = Host/address to listen for XDMCP connections (use all addresses if not present)
    # key = Authentication key to use for XDM-AUTHENTICATION-1 or blank to not use authentication (stored in keys.conf)
    # hostname = Hostname to report to XDMCP clients (defaults to system hostname if unset)
    #
    # The authentication key is a 56 bit DES key specified in hex as 0xnnnnnnnnnnnnnn.  Alternatively
    # it can be a word and the first 7 characters are used as the key.
    #
    [XDMCPServer]
    #enabled=false
    #port=177
    #listen-address=
    #key=
    #hostname=
    
    #
    # VNC Server configuration
    #
    # enabled = True if VNC connections should be allowed
    # command = Command to run Xvnc server with
    # port = TCP/IP port to listen for connections on
    # listen-address = Host/address to listen for VNC connections (use all addresses if not present)
    # width = Width of display to use
    # height = Height of display to use
    # depth = Color depth of display to use
    #
    [VNCServer]
    #enabled=false
    #command=Xvnc
    #port=5900
    #listen-address=
    #width=1024
    #height=768
    #depth=8
    
    
  • you should edit the file (with gedit or other text editor you like):
    sudo gedit /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf
    look for autologin=YOURUSERNAME
    just delete YOURUSERNAME
    next time if you want autologin again just add YOURUSERNAME
    Save the file and that’s it.
    good luck

    Antergos (default OS) - WIN10 (abandoned)
    I3wm - Mate desktop
    AMD - A4 7300 Radeon graphics
    16 GB ram
    HD 1 TB
    Linux newbie since 06/2016

  • OK!
    Worked just fine!

    1. sudo kate /etc/group and deleted the username of the autologin group and
    2. sudo kate /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf and deleted the username from autologin=
      Many thanks!
  • You’re welcome.
    :+1:

    Antergos (default OS) - WIN10 (abandoned)
    I3wm - Mate desktop
    AMD - A4 7300 Radeon graphics
    16 GB ram
    HD 1 TB
    Linux newbie since 06/2016

  • @fernandomaroto said in How to disable auto login:

    sudo gedit /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf

    One should avoid running graphical programs with sudo, better use kdesudo, or gksudo or any xsudo installed on your system (depends on your DE), because using sudo can lead to permission errors.

    EDIT:
    Source (German)
    Source (English)

  • that’s insteresting, never heard about it. Thanks for the tip and i’ll read about it.
    :+1:

    Antergos (default OS) - WIN10 (abandoned)
    I3wm - Mate desktop
    AMD - A4 7300 Radeon graphics
    16 GB ram
    HD 1 TB
    Linux newbie since 06/2016

  • @liketechnik2000
    Does it matter if the file that we are going to edit is already owned by root (as in our case lightdm.conf and group are)?

  • @linuxited No, because the files wich are problematic are the config files for the specific graphical program you are starting. These are usually located in your .home directory. If you start the program as root, the config files will be saved with the owner root, so if you want to change the settings of the program later you’'ll get errors, because you don’t have permission to edit the config files.

  • @liketechnik2000
    So if I got it wright, it is ok to edit files in /root folder with plain sudo
    and not ok to edit files in /home folder with plain sudo.

  • @linuxited No, the problem is not with the file(s) you are editing, but with the file(s) the program you use modifies. So if you use sudo, use a terminal program like nano for editing text files. If you use one of the sudo wrappers I mentioned in my post above, you can use gparted.

    Examples:

    • Edit file /home/$USER/file: no need for sudo, because you own the file. Use whatever program you like for editing text files.
    • Edit file /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf: need for sudo, because file is owned by root. Use sudo when using a terminal only program like nano. Use gksudo or an equivalent (but not pure sudo ) when using gedit or any oher graphical program.
  • @liketechnik2000 ΟΚ!
    Thank you for the clarification!

  • @linuxited No problem, I accidentally used sudo for graphical programs as I started to use Linux (It was on Raspbian on a RaspberryPi). As i wanted to use that program again without sudo I got a lot of errors, so I think this is something wich should be mentioned when introducing sudo (especially to new users).

  • It’s all new for me too, thank you very much :+1:

    Antergos (default OS) - WIN10 (abandoned)
    I3wm - Mate desktop
    AMD - A4 7300 Radeon graphics
    16 GB ram
    HD 1 TB
    Linux newbie since 06/2016

auto8 login72 disable11 Posts 18Views 2191
Log in to reply