• Old Hard Drive in a New System - It Worked!


    I bought a new machine today and was having problems with the new OS, so I had this mad idea–why not try putting my old hard drive in my new machine? Amazingly, it worked. Windows 10 downloaded all the necessary new drivers and booted right in, but Antergos gave me a few hiccups-- namely the following:

    • ERROR: resume: hibernation device ‘UUID=number1’ not found.
      ERROR: device ‘UUID=number2’ not found. Skipping fsck.
      ERROR: unable to find root device ‘UUI=number2’.
      type ‘exit’ to try & continue booting.
      sh: can’t access tty; job control turned off.
      [rootfs/]#

    I can’t actually type ‘exit’ in, as the whole thing freezes up–however, if I restart and boot in via safe mode, Antergos loads just fine.

    I’ve left out the UUID numbers because I couldn’t be arsed to type them out, but number1 is the UUID for my swap partition, and number2 is my root partition. I also did a ‘free -m’ to see whether the swap file was working, and it appears to be.

    • free -m
      total used free shared buff/cache available
      Mem: 7937 439 6996 12 501 7409
      Swap: 7497 0 7497

    I know the swap size is a bit out of whack, but it’s a leftover from my old machine. I’ll make it bigger the next time I do a full reinstall.

    I’m not sure whether these errors are the result of me changing virtually all of my hardware and then expecting an older drive to run it, or are a result of idiosyncratic new system woes. In other words, would I have had the same errors had I done a clean install?

    Any thoughts/help would be greatly appreciated. For the record: when I say ‘old drive’ it’s probably 6 months old and 3 TB. It’s just ‘old’ because it came from the machine that just went kaput.

    Lenovo H50-50 Sharkbay, Intel® Core i7 4790 Haswell CPU @ 3.60 GH, 2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GT 720, 8.00GB Single-Channel DDR3 @ 798MHz, Windows 10 Pro 64-bit, Antergos 64-bit, 2GB WDC (SATA), 3GB TOSHIBA (SATA).

  • Hi,

    A ls -la /dev/disk/by-uuid/ will help you to figure out if your uuids are ok or not.

    Cheers!

  • @karasu Thanks, Karasu. ‘ls -la /dev/disk/by-uuid/’ returns…

    * [[email protected] ~]$ ls -la /dev/disk/by-uuid/
    total 0
    drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 320 Dec  1 22:36 .
    drwxr-xr-x 7 root root 140 Dec  1 22:36 ..
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:37 00BCF2651E117D5D -> ../../sda2
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 0B7E715703F79440 -> ../../sdb3
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 241C35C93BBBEED8 -> ../../sdb7
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 295E51DA11C479D5 -> ../../sdb5
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:37 32389ACE18090343 -> ../../sda8
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 35ec28e2-d8a3-4970-9348-5adc11b35019 -> ../../sda5
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:37 3A0C1C6A0C1C2383 -> ../../sda1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:37 3F7D050778FCF110 -> ../../sda9
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 4C5A6F6C35F4959A -> ../../sdb4
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 4FF0A1490C437BBB -> ../../sdb6
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 53C8A1F170167D87 -> ../../sdb2
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 5C2BBC125C9162EA -> ../../sdb1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:37 7c21855f-f42f-4a2e-851d-e881fa599032 -> ../../sda6
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  10 Dec  1 22:36 e17573a7-56e3-453e-b36f-a26ee7f1aa4c -> ../../sda7
    

    I’m not sure whether there’s anything wrong with the result or not. How does it look?

    Lenovo H50-50 Sharkbay, Intel® Core i7 4790 Haswell CPU @ 3.60 GH, 2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GT 720, 8.00GB Single-Channel DDR3 @ 798MHz, Windows 10 Pro 64-bit, Antergos 64-bit, 2GB WDC (SATA), 3GB TOSHIBA (SATA).

  • @melchizedek said:

    @karasu Thanks, Karuso. ‘ls -la /dev/disk/by-uuid/’ returns…

    I’m not sure whether there’s anything wrong with the result or not. How does it look?

    The output looks fine. There’s nothing wrong with it.

    But there was no need to post it here. The previous answerer has suggested you to use the ls ... command to find out UUIDs of all your devices and to confront them against the content of /etc/fstab file in the Antergos installation you’re trying to boot.

    UUIDs used in /etc/fstab must be identical to those returned by ls ... command.

    As always in Linux, the same result may be obtained in many different ways. Instead of ls ... command you may also use

    lsblk -f
    

    It returns device names, labels, UUIDs in nice, easily readable format.

    Again, it’s up to you to figure out and to decide, whether your /etc/fstab/ is correct or not.

    Another thing. To figure out the current swap space state and usage, there’s a very handy command

    swapon -s
    
  • Sorry @melchizedek , I thought it was self explaining, but I see now that it was not.
    And thanks @just for explaining it.

    Cheers!

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