• How to know the content of the updates proposed by Pacman ?


    Hi

    when system updates are proposed automatically (by pacman I assume ?), how to get a description of the changes made for each modules ?
    For instance, Linux Mint software update application does that very well.

    Thanks!

  • Mint aside, remaining strictly inside the Arch’s world - can you give a real example of changes description, that you see elsewhere but not in pacman? For any package of your choice. And where/how did you get that description?

    It’s not a problem to display changelogs for the packages to be upgraded. The problem is that none of the packages installed here (or in pending upgrade) has an associated changelog. Don’t know why. There’s nothing to display.

    edit: It’s always possible to view package information, only for the packages to be upgraded. But probably it’s not what you’re looking for.

  • @just Hi. I am actually new in the Arch world. I discovered it a few months ago through Antergos and adopted in on my laptop.
    I have been using Mint for quite a while on my family desktop PC and it is why I was making the comparison. I have not so much to propose then.

    That being said, I don’t know whether the automatic system / software update is managed by Gnome or by Pacman and I might have created a confusion here. Sorry for that.
    What I am after is indeed the changelog (or an abstract) of the updates. When there is a new version, what is the purpose (bug fix, new features,…).

    Am I clearer ? :worried:

  • @squid-f said:

    …That being said, I don’t know whether the automatic system / software update is managed by Gnome or by Pacman and I might have created a confusion here. Sorry for that.
    What I am after is indeed the changelog (or an abstract) of the updates. When there is a new version, what is the purpose (bug fix, new features,…).

    Am I clearer ? :worried:

    Absolutely. And don’t be worried :smile: . We’re all constantly learning something new in Linux.

    Neither Gnome nor any other DE (like Mate, XFCE, Cinnamon, Kde, Plasma, etc) manage software updates. Neither in Arch nor in any other distro.

    And yes, pacman is the root for all software updates in Arch .

    Your original question - Where/how to get the changelog for a package? - is indeed very interesting. Why changelogs are not available in Arch? Don’t know.

    There’s the -Qc command that serves specifically to display a package’s changelog. But the changelog doesn’t exist,for any package I try:

    $ pacman -Qc pacman
    error: no changelog available for 'pacman'.
    $ 
    

    Without specyfying a package name, the simple pacman -Qc command tries to find and display changelogs for all installed packages. It finds nothing to display for about 700…900 installed packages. Not only in Antergos but also in native Arch:

    ...
     error: no changelog available for 'xterm'.
     error: no changelog available for 'xvidcore'.
    error: no changelog available for 'xz'.
    error: no changelog available for 'yajl'.
    error: no changelog available for 'yaourt'.
    error: no changelog available for 'yelp'.
    error: no changelog available for 'yelp-xsl'.
    error: no changelog available for 'zeitgeist'.
    error: no changelog available for 'zenity'.
    error: no changelog available for 'zim'.
    error: no changelog available for 'zip'.
    error: no changelog available for 'zita-alsa-pcmi'.
    error: no changelog available for 'zita-resampler'.
    error: no changelog available for 'zlib'.
    $ 
    

    Again, don’t know why.

    Concluding:

    • to get the list of packages pacman wants to upgrade, without elevating user privileges (useful command)

      $ checkupdates
      clutter-gst
      libsystemd
      pacman-mirrorlist
      systemd
      systemd-sysvcompat
      $ 
      
    • to get and display changelogs only for packages being upgraded (useless command)

      pacman -Qc $(checkupdates)
      
    • most probably it will return nothing useful, because for some obscure reason those logs don’t exist

      $ pacman -Qc $(checkupdates)
      error: no changelog available for 'clutter-gst'.
      error: no changelog available for 'libsystemd'.
      error: no changelog available for 'pacman-mirrorlist'.
      error: no changelog available for 'systemd'.
      error: no changelog available for 'systemd-sysvcompat'.
      $ 
      
    • to get and display package info only for packages being upgraded (useless command)

       pacman -Si $(checkupdates)
      
    • the endless output is

      $ pacman -Si $(checkupdates)
      Repository     : extra
      Name           : clutter-gst
      Version        : 3.0.6-4
      Description    : GStreamer bindings for clutter
      Architecture   : x86_64
      URL            : http://www.clutter-project.org/
      Licenses       : LGPL
      Groups         : None
      Provides       : None
      Depends On     : clutter  gst-plugins-base-libs  libxdamage  libgudev
      Optional Deps  : None
      Conflicts With : None
      Replaces       : None
      Download Size  :  94.58 KiB
      Installed Size : 781.00 KiB
      Packager       : Jan Alexander Steffens (heftig) <[email protected]>
      Build Date     : Thu 16 Jul 2015 22:58:29 MSK
      Validated By   : MD5 Sum  SHA256 Sum  Signature
      
      Repository     : core
      Name           : libsystemd
      Version        : 221-2
      Description    : systemd client libraries
      Architecture   : x86_64
      URL            : http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd
      Licenses       : GPL2
      Groups         : None
      Provides       : libsystemd.so=0-64  libsystemd-daemon.so=0-64  libsystemd-id128.so=0-64  libsystemd-journal.so=0-64
                       libsystemd-login.so=0-64  libudev.so=1-64
      Depends On     : glib2  glibc  libgcrypt  lz4  xz
      Optional Deps  : None
      Conflicts With : None
      Replaces       : None
      Download Size  : 258.39 KiB
      Installed Size : 878.00 KiB
      Packager       : Evangelos Foutras <[email protected]>
      Build Date     : Fri 26 Jun 2015 22:55:33 MSK
      Validated By   : MD5 Sum  SHA256 Sum  Signature
      
      Repository     : core
      Name           : pacman-mirrorlist
      Version        : 20150713-1
      Description    : Arch Linux mirror list for use by pacman
      Architecture   : any
      URL            : https://www.archlinux.org/mirrorlist/
      Licenses       : GPL
      Groups         : None
      Provides       : None
      Depends On     : None
      Optional Deps  : None
      Conflicts With : None
      Replaces       : None
      Download Size  :   3.50 KiB
      Installed Size :  28.00 KiB
      Packager       : Florian Pritz <[email protected]>
      Build Date     : Mon 13 Jul 2015 17:22:49 MSK
      Validated By   : MD5 Sum  SHA256 Sum  Signature
      
      Repository     : core
      Name           : systemd
      Version        : 221-2
      Description    : system and service manager
      Architecture   : x86_64
      URL            : http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd
      Licenses       : GPL2  LGPL2.1
      Groups         : None
      Provides       : nss-myhostname  systemd-tools=221  udev=221
      Depends On     : acl  bash  dbus  glib2  iptables  kbd  kmod  hwids  libcap  libgcrypt  libsystemd  libidn  lz4  pam  libseccomp
                       util-linux  xz
      Optional Deps  : python: systemd library bindings
                       cryptsetup: required for encrypted block devices
                       libmicrohttpd: remote journald capabilities
                       quota-tools: kernel-level quota management
                       systemd-sysvcompat: symlink package to provide sysvinit binaries
                       polkit: allow administration as unprivileged user
      Conflicts With : nss-myhostname  systemd-tools  udev
      Replaces       : nss-myhostname  systemd-tools  udev
      Download Size  :   5.40 MiB
      Installed Size :  29.76 MiB
      Packager       : Evangelos Foutras <[email protected]>
      Build Date     : Fri 26 Jun 2015 22:54:47 MSK
      Validated By   : MD5 Sum  SHA256 Sum  Signature
      
      Repository     : core
      Name           : systemd-sysvcompat
      Version        : 221-2
      Description    : sysvinit compat for systemd
      Architecture   : x86_64
      URL            : http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd
      Licenses       : GPL2
      Groups         : base
      Provides       : None
      Depends On     : systemd
      Optional Deps  : None
      Conflicts With : sysvinit
      Replaces       : None
      Download Size  :   5.65 KiB
      Installed Size :   5.00 KiB
      Packager       : Evangelos Foutras <[email protected]>
      Build Date     : Fri 26 Jun 2015 22:55:35 MSK
      Validated By   : MD5 Sum  SHA256 Sum  Signature
      
      $ 
      

    Any package has a very detailed changes description here. Unfortunately, not in human-readable format (python2)

  • @squid-f said:

    how to get a description of the changes made for each modules ?

    I hope this helps…

    " Warning: Instead of immediately updating as soon as updates are available, users must recognize that due to the nature of Arch’s rolling release approach, an update may have unforeseen consequences. This means that it is not wise to update if, for example, one is about to deliver an important presentation. Rather, update during free time and be prepared to deal with any problems that may arise.

    pacman is a powerful package management tool, but it does not attempt to handle all corner cases. Read The Arch Way if this causes confusion. Users must be vigilant and take responsibility for maintaining their own system. When performing a system update, it is essential that users read all information output by pacman and use common sense. If a user-modified configuration file needs to be upgraded for a new version of a package, a .pacnew file will be created to avoid overwriting settings modified by the user. pacman will prompt the user to merge them. These files require manual intervention from the user and it is good practice to handle them right after every package upgrade or removal. See Pacnew and Pacsave files for more info.
    Tip: Remember that pacman’s output is logged in /var/log/pacman.log.
    Tip: You can use a log viewer such as wat-gitAUR to search the pacman logs.

    Before upgrading, it is advisable to visit the Arch Linux home page to check the latest news (alternatively subscribe to the RSS feed, arch-announce mailing list, or follow @archlinux on Twitter), when updates require out-of-the-ordinary user intervention (more than what can be handled simply by following the instructions given by pacman), an appropriate news post will be made.

    If one encounters problems that cannot be solved by these instructions, make sure to search the forum. It is likely that others have encountered the same problem and have posted instructions for solving it.".

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Pacman

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • Thanks to both of you.

    So, it is more than challenging to know the reason behind the update.
    Then, if I understood well Anarch as well, one should wisely think before updating.

    How do you do then to decide whether among the several daily system updates proposed you chose to update or not ? Is there a way to sort out the security updates from the others ?

    Thanks again for educating me on this topic!

  • To tell you the truth, never have I bothered studying any literature beforehand. I have been with Antergos as my main OS and using it daily and long and nothing dramatic has happened over this period… I can only recall a couple of minor issues that took a day or two to get fixed…:thumbsup:

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • @squid-f said:

    …How do you do then to decide whether among the several daily system updates proposed you chose to update or not ?..

    The keyword is: backup.

    If you feel that your Arch system is stable and well-working, backup it. Backup as frequently as you can. I backup daily. Don’t delete older backups. Keep at least three recent backups. fsarchiver and clonezilla are two excellent tools for backing up.

    Being secured by backups, accept and apply all numerous (three-six) daily Arch updates, without a doubt. Update immediately. Usually there’s no much sense in delaying updates with Arch.

    Arch is unbelievably stable. There’s the Arch installation here that happily rolls from 2010. Without big troubles or re-installations. More stable than Arch is only Debian stable. With two-years old software, which is never updated.

    Yes, some minor inconveniences are possible. They are usually solved in one-two days. It’s also possible to not wait that long and solve them yourself. Much faster.

    That said, Arch is not a system for a blind use, like windows, mint or ubuntu. Read, learn, think constantly while using it. Arch will reward with the best experience one might ever expect from Linux.

  • Thanks guys.
    I stop bugging you :smirk: here.
    I understand your points and I learned something on system backup I am going to dig into ; thanks for that as well.

    @just said:

    That said, Arch is not a system for a blind use, like windows, mint or ubuntu. Read, learn, think constantly while using it. Arch will reward with the best experience one might ever expect from Linux.

    So far, I use Mint on the family desktop PC because of Cinnamon integration, allowing a good acceptance of Linux over Windows from the rest of the family. I am wondering whether Cinnamon is really made for other distros (just a feeling though).
    I use as well OpenSuse on my HTPC / Onwcloud PC because YaST is very powerful to administrate the server and NFS sharing.
    In regards of my user experience, I have to say I am impressed by Antergos. It is fast and indeed stable. On the top of that, the Arch Wiki is awesome. I found OpenSuse as stable but less fast and much less cutting edge !
    Mint is stable but the recent Cinnamon update seems to have created a messy behavior with some Gnome modules. I would not use Mint blindly :smile:

    If Cinnamon is very well integrated in Antergos, I might think switching to that on the family desktop PC. If I can find my way to set a server up on Antergos, I might install it on the HTPC/Cloud PC (I have been surprised though by a weird NFS behavior on Arch - see other post). Or, keeping multiple distros in parallel helps staying open-minded, solving some issues more quickly and proposing new features.
    All of that is for the sake of future challenges I like with Linux. It is of course beyond this post.

    So, meanwhile, thanks again and see you around :sunglasses:

  • @squid-f said:

    …I use Mint on the family desktop PC because of Cinnamon integration, allowing a good acceptance of Linux over Windows from the rest of the family. I am wondering whether Cinnamon is really made for other distros (just a feeling though). …

    Antergos Cinnamon works very well. Time sharing among various Antergos DEs here looks like

    • Cinnamon 60%
    • Mate 30%
    • Kde4 9%
    • Gnome 1%

    Time sharing between Antergos Cinnamon and LMDE Cinnamon is about

    • Antergos 99%
    • LMDE 1%

    Applets may behave strangely (don’t work well) in Antergos Cinnamon panel right after a fresh installation. Just reset them to default settings from

    System Settings --> Applets --> Restore to default

    Applets would turn to work normally.

  • @just said:

    Antergos Cinnamon works very well. Time sharing among various Antergos DEs here looks like

    • Cinnamon 60%
    • Mate 30%
    • Kde4 9%
    • Gnome 1%

    Time sharing between Antergos Cinnamon and LMDE Cinnamon is about

    • Antergos 99%
    • LMDE 1%

    Hi Just, appreciated the information and sorry for my dummy question :blush: : how do you define time sharing ? Time spent by Antergos development team(might not be as you mention LMDE…) ? Proportion of users who have chosen Cinnamon DE ? Or something else ?

    Thanks for your support

  • “time sharing” is only a personal perception of various dsitros’ reliability that work here. Nothing else.

    • Arch works. Always.

    • LMDE 2 Betsy is good as well. But not as fresh as Arch.

    • siduction indiansummer is closest to Arch. Unfortunately, it breaks two times a month here.

    It is safe to ignore any post from @just. Follow advices from @karasu and @lots-0-logs only.

  • Ok, got it. Thanks.
    I am surpised then by the 1% for Antergos Gnome. So far, for me, it has been 100% reliable.

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