• Laptop with Non-Removable Battery


    I have a Toshiba ultrabook with a non removable battery. I have read that it is not a good thing to leave a laptop plugged in all the time with a battery installed, but since I can’t remove mine, this presents a minor issue.

    I know that with some Lenovo laptops. they have a Windows app to put the laptop in “conservation” mode to not allow the battery to charge to full capacity when plugged in and used for long stretches, supposedly to help extend the life of the battery.

    Is there a feature like this in Linux, or should I really just not worry too much about it? I have my laptop on and plugged in a lot at work, because I use it for personal browsing instead of my work PC. Granted, I don’t usually hold on to a laptop for more than two years, so it may be a moot point… But still, I’d like to keep the hardware in good shape for the next user.

  • I’m interested in this too, I have a Lenovo with non-removable battery and have to plug/unplug when battery reaches 100% or below 15%.

  • With my Dell Ultrabook, what I do is to charge the battery to 100%, and when I aviza this alrrededor 10%, put it to load, otherwise; is just a myth and also a bit of luck on that battery touches you, for more quality control teams that have these … and on the other hand, it also depends on what you den.-

    Autodidacta en la VIDA …y en Linux, también.

    1. Yes Its not a good thing to keep laptop plugged in for long, I have a HP laptop and I can tell you the original battery that came with my laptop is no longer usable.
    2. Play video games rarely on your laptop. everything that makes your laptop hot is responsible for your slowly-dying battery…
    3. If your battery is unremovable, what the hell are you doing on Linux, go to windows, your non-removale battery will have a MUCH longer lifespan if your laptop runs windows.
    4. If you’re still willing to stay on linux, just install Proprietary drivers for whatever GPU you have.
    5. Additionally, install TLP.(Just install it and forget)

    Archlinux x64

    AMD A4-3305M Processor
    6GB RAM
    1GB+512MB Hybrid AMD GPU

  • @Yash said:

    Its not a good thing to keep laptop plugged in for long,

    Tops is what the manual of the particular manufacturer recomends…
    Then…
    http://www.marco.org/2009/09/24/laptop-battery-myths
    Or…
    For more info, have a look at Google, our indescrete friend…:thumbsup:
    Just an example…
    https://www.google.gr/search?q=Its+not+a+good+thing+to+keep+laptop+plugged+in+for+long%2C&oq=Its+not+a+good+thing+to+keep+laptop+plugged+in+for+long%2C&aqs=chrome…69i57&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8
    It is not a plain YES?NO answer…

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • I don’t think this is still an issue with today’s laptops. They simply bypass the battery once its fully charged. I could be making that up but I’m at least 80% sure its a fact :grimacing:

  • @lots.0.logs said:

    I could be making that up but I’m at least 80% sure its a fact

    I can credit you with the missing 20%. . Modern technology battery manufactures don`t give any special recomendations on this issue. For anyone using older technology though, it is suggested that he chek it out with the manufacturer of the product (laptop or battery)…

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • @lots.0.logs said:

    I don’t think this is still an issue with today’s laptops. They simply bypass the battery once its fully charged. I could be making that up but I’m at least 80% sure its a fact :grimacing:

    I remember reading the same thing on some official support page from the manufacturer of my ultrabook. I was concerned about it at the time, since as a normal laptop user, you want the longest duration when unplugged/on the go; but plugging/unplugging when working for hours at home is somewhat unpractical. I was looking for some linux software to “disconnect” the battery when fully charged, and I stumbled upon some official linux info that mentioned that when fully charged, modern batteries automatically bypass voltage. Kind of necessary when you think about ultrabooks with non-removable batteries.
    I really didn’t want to move back to windows like yash said! lol

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