• Can I install Cinnamon alongside Gnome?


    Hi, I’m using Gnome and I’d like to test Cinnamon. Is it safe to install these 2 DEs in the same system without any conflict? And will it be easy to roll back if I decide to remove Cinnamon ?

    Intel NUC D54250WYK, 16 Gb RAM, 1 Tb SSD
    Multi -boot (no MS-Win &no UEFI) Legacy MBR with GPT

  • short answers

    1. yes, it’s safe to install cinnamon alongside gnome.
    2. no, it’s not safe to install two DEs on the same partition (system).
    3. no, it won’t be easy to remove cinnamon from gnome.

    longer answers

    1. avoid installing two DEs on the same partition (system).
    2. though some DEs may seem similar, conflicts will inevitably arise.
    3. it’s easier to format a spare partition with DE in test, than trying to remove it from another DE.

    best answers

    1. do not add cinnamon to gnome.
    2. use an empty partition to install cinnamon into it.
    3. if possible, try to limit 1 post to 1 question only.
  • @ant77 I’ve found it to be a good practice to create separate user accounts for each DE that you install. Each user account should be used for logging in under just one DE. Then you can symlink your personal directories (Documents, Downloads, Music, etc) from your current user directory to the new ones to have access to them easily.

    Cheers!

  • hi ant your doing better than me i cant even get to use my installed an im so mad im almost ready to go back to freakin winblows i shouldnt have this much trouble just to get to use what i installed an i tryd everything i was told by people that know see i got ge9300 nvidia card an it hates nouveau drivers an sadly cnchi dont install the drivers i need so im screwd an i dont like it sorry to ramble on just 1 of those days well3days reason i wrote was wanted to ask why you chose those 2 why not kde an xfce or something lol lol just nosie i guess why people pick what thay pick dont mind me sorry to bother you all

  • Thank you guys for your wise advices. I know that’s always better to use an empty partition to install a new OS, but as I like to test a lot my HD is starting to complain about free space. That’s why I’d like to try Cinnamon & Gnome together, since they use many common files & softwares. I did a test some time ago with Xfce as a second desktop and I didn’t have any conflicts or issues, but Xfce is so nice & friendly that it could do no harm to anything :)
    Anyway for now I keep my antergos gnome safe and alone, because I like it so much and I’m scared I could mess up my system. But I have a VM with antergos Cinnamon and I just tried sudo pacman -S gnome… I re-booted and everything is ok, it’s amazing I can’t even see the cinnamon control center, only gnome settings shows up in the list of apps, as if gnome were the only DE. I’ll t’est for some time and see…
    @lots-0-logs thanks for your suggestion. Using a second account to log in to another DE it’s a good idea. But if I remember well I did it some time ago and I had permissions issues sharing my personal directories. I’m not sure but I think it is necessary to create a new group to share files, or let the second user belong to the same group of the first account?
    @loner I wish you good luck and please don’t give up! and never mind I already have both kde and xfce installed in another place, but I do prefer Antergos gnome.

    Intel NUC D54250WYK, 16 Gb RAM, 1 Tb SSD
    Multi -boot (no MS-Win &no UEFI) Legacy MBR with GPT

  • @ant77 said:

    …I can’t even see the cinnamon control center, only gnome settings shows up in the list of apps, as if gnome were the only DE…

    if you have autologin enabled, then you should logout from the current session. this will return you to login screen. in the bottom left corner of the login window there’s a button with the list of available sessions (mate, gnome, cinnamon, etc). choose the one you want and proceed with login normally. this will bring you to the selected session.

    edit:

    in order the button with available sessions to appear, it is necessary to select a user which will be logged in. otherwise the button is not visible (hidden).

  • @just Sorry for my English, what I meant was that Cinnamon and Gnome are doing very well together in a VM. I can’t even see the cinnamon system settings IN GNOME, and the other way… I don’t see the Gnome Control center IN CINNAMON. Which is the way it should be, no conflicts at all so far.
    May be I’ll give it a try later in the real system. I’m also encouraged by another thread and what @bobmcbobertson said:

    @bobmcbobertson said:

    Another thing I have noticed that is different between Antergos and Ubuntu is how well they work if you have multiple DEs installed. In Ubuntu there were a lot of compatibility issues that would pop up if you had a few DEs. I have KDE Plasma 5 (which is atrocious by the way, I would recommend Plasma 4 as I think it’s much nicer), Xfce, LXDE, Cinnamon, MATE, GNOME, and I think there may be one or two more that I can’t remember off the top of my head, installed on my Antergos system and I don’t have any of the problems of compatibility–where programs will try to pull styling and so forth from one DE into another and not be able to do it and so the programs crash or don’t look correctly etc. I don’t know why Antergos has less of an issue with handling multiple DEs than Ubuntu does, but that’s just been my experience having used it all these months.

    Intel NUC D54250WYK, 16 Gb RAM, 1 Tb SSD
    Multi -boot (no MS-Win &no UEFI) Legacy MBR with GPT

  • @ant77 said:

    …Which is the way it should be, no conflicts at all so far.

    it was hard to expect something else, a negative result. cinnamon was born and still uses gnome base, so both co-exist pretty well one with another. i only wanted to warn you that it could be difficult to remove cinnamon, once you add it to existing gnome.

    before installing gnome + cinnamon on a metal, you could try to remove cinnamon from VM. if you succeed, without damaging gnome, and if you’re happy with two DEs in one partition - go for it.

    personally, i prefer to follow a simple rule of thumb, which never failed here - one partition, one DE.

  • @ant77 Only issue I’ve had is with mouse cursors and the colors of fonts and windows–and that seems mostly to be related to settings in KDE (when I installed Antergos I installed it with KDE as the default). So, for example, the settings in KDE related to GTK and so forth will override the settings in other DEs and the look of the mouse cursor in Cinnamon (as an example) will only look correct on the desktop and in the panel etc, but if I launch Banshee or Chrome or whatever then inside that program’s window the cursor changes to reflect KDE’s settings. But these issues are very minor and don’t affect the stability and usability of the system–it’s just cosmetic. :) I’m also sure there’s probably a way of correcting them, I just haven’t felt like it’s a big enough deal to try to fix it. :D

    "Odious ideas are not entitled to hide from criticism behind the human shield of their believers' feelings." --Richard Stallman

  • @just That’s actually really good advice! I’d never heard that before, everything I know about Linux I’ve learned on my own since I never had anyone teach me anything about it. So, it had just never occurred to me to break things up that way. I’d also seen someone else suggest using one DE per user and having a different username for each DE, which also seems like a good way to separate things and that had never occurred to me, either. Good advice! Thanks! :D

    "Odious ideas are not entitled to hide from criticism behind the human shield of their believers' feelings." --Richard Stallman

  • @bobmcbobertson said:

    …I’d never heard that before…

    neither me :smiley: . it’s my own rule, found with experience, for a cost of countless hours uselessly lost trying to fix some stupid problem, desperation, tons of bad, non-printable words… keeping things as simple as possible greatly reduces the probability of errors.

  • @just said:

    @bobmcbobertson said:

    …I’d never heard that before…

    neither me :smiley: . it’s my own rule, found with experience, for a cost of countless hours uselessly lost trying to fix some stupid problem, desperation, tons of bad, non-printable words… keeping things as simple as possible greatly reduces the probability of errors.

    Same here. Everything I know, I learned on my own. I cant tell you how maany hours I spent with a borked system. Its actually where I got the idea for my username. In the beginning I started with Ubuntu and as soon as I began to venture out into things that weren’t the default in Ubuntu, well…lets just say I became very familiar with reading X server logs (Xorg.0.log) :laughing:

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