• Antergos: Security


    Hello, I am an Arch Linux user who looks forward to switching from Arch to Antergos, as I look for a simpler way of using my desktop and having things break less often, since I am now going into a tougher routine and no longer can deal with using my time to fix problems that occasionally occur in my system.

    I was indicated by one of my friends to try out Antergos linux rather than Manjaro; he said that Manjaro linux’s package upgrades are far behind Arch Linux’s because they take a long time to be tested, considered stable and then added to the repositories for download. His reference, was the following:

    The Arch stable repos are synced into Manjaro Unstable on a roughly daily basis. They sit there for 1-2 weeks before being declared stable and moving to Manjaro Testing. Then their test squad declares that stable enough to move to Manjaro Stable, about 3-4 weeks after the packages arrive in Arch Linux.

    And this is the issue. There is four weeks until Manjaro users get package updates. That is still a lot quicker than a non-rolling release distribution I hear you say, but it ignores one of the fundamentals of a rolling release distribution. Security fixes come with a new software release. On a fixed-point release distribution, security fixes are backported into your out-of-date software versions to maintain stability. On a rolling release distribution, you just release the newer version of the software that comes with most security fixes (some backporting from the upstream VCS is required if a release is not made).

    That means, Manjaro users are vulnerable to security bugs for around a month after Arch users are safe, unless of course the Manjaro Core Team monitors every package and pushes those with security fixes. How many packages in a distribution? Arch Linux has >6000 in its binary repositories. I suppose it is not impossible to monitor that many packages, unless of course your Core Team consists of three people. And given those three people provide five variants of their installation ISO (net install, XFCE, KDE, Cinnamon, MATE – with OpenBox and E17 on the way…) and provide a series of kernel packages and systemd… Things are looking bleak.

    And so, Manjaro users are stuck with packages having security issues for a while. I’d assume the big ones get through quicker. Although their firefox package has not been updated to version 18 yet, which fixes 21 security issues – 12 of which are marked critical. In fact, firefox version 18 has not even made their Unstable repo as I am writing this. […]

    And so, here is my question: Can Antergos’s situation relate to the text above? I am highly worried about the security of my computer, so I need to know how secure is the system that’ll be housing my files.

    Any answers are welcome!

  • Hello, I am an Arch Linux user who looks forward to switching from Arch to Antergos, as I look for a simpler way of using my desktop and having things break less often, since I am now going into a tougher routine and no longer can deal with using my time to fix problems that occasionally occur in my system.

    I was indicated by one of my friends to try out Antergos linux rather than Manjaro; he said that Manjaro linux’s package upgrades are far behind Arch Linux’s because they take a long time to be tested, considered stable and then added to the repositories for download. His reference, was the following:

    The Arch stable repos are synced into Manjaro Unstable on a roughly daily basis. They sit there for 1-2 weeks before being declared stable and moving to Manjaro Testing. Then their test squad declares that stable enough to move to Manjaro Stable, about 3-4 weeks after the packages arrive in Arch Linux.

    And this is the issue. There is four weeks until Manjaro users get package updates. That is still a lot quicker than a non-rolling release distribution I hear you say, but it ignores one of the fundamentals of a rolling release distribution. Security fixes come with a new software release. On a fixed-point release distribution, security fixes are backported into your out-of-date software versions to maintain stability. On a rolling release distribution, you just release the newer version of the software that comes with most security fixes (some backporting from the upstream VCS is required if a release is not made).

    That means, Manjaro users are vulnerable to security bugs for around a month after Arch users are safe, unless of course the Manjaro Core Team monitors every package and pushes those with security fixes. How many packages in a distribution? Arch Linux has >6000 in its binary repositories. I suppose it is not impossible to monitor that many packages, unless of course your Core Team consists of three people. And given those three people provide five variants of their installation ISO (net install, XFCE, KDE, Cinnamon, MATE – with OpenBox and E17 on the way…) and provide a series of kernel packages and systemd… Things are looking bleak.

    And so, Manjaro users are stuck with packages having security issues for a while. I’d assume the big ones get through quicker. Although their firefox package has not been updated to version 18 yet, which fixes 21 security issues – 12 of which are marked critical. In fact, firefox version 18 has not even made their Unstable repo as I am writing this. […]

    And so, here is my question: Can Antergos’s situation relate to the text above? I am highly worried about the security of my computer, so I need to know how secure is the system that’ll be housing my files.

    Any answers are welcome!

  • In fact, Antergos uses the Arch repositories as they come, plus an Antergos one, mostly for configuration purposes

    1.Antergos Linux KDE plasma / Gnome 2.Ubuntu 17.10 64bit Unity
    Intel Core2 Duo CPU P8400 2.26GHz‖ RAM 3908 MiB ‖ Dell Inc. 0F328M - Dell Inc. Latitude E6500
    Intel Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics [8086:2a42] {i915

  • @“armadillo”:2fpvqnkv said:

    Can Antergos’s situation relate to the text above? I am highly worried about the security of my computer, so I need to know how secure is the system that’ll be housing my files.[/quote:2fpvqnkv]

    Antergos is actually 100% Compatible with Arch. Antergos doesn’t create a separate “fake stable” repository, instead Antergos uses the official repos and even the AUR untouched.

    Antergos is not just an installer though as it does include its own repository but this repository is actually more of a polishing repo for the Cnchi setups. If you choose KDE to install then Antergos pulls all the packages from the official Arch repos but then also pulls in nice themes, icons, fonts, etc from the Antergos repo to improve the look and flow of KDE.

    Antergos does this as well with all the other DEs to improve the overall look and actually bring consistency across all DEs no matter which one you choose. The icons for example are the same throughout all of the DEs.

    Essentially, Antergos is a completely unique Distro because it is NOT a derivative or a fork because it uses only official Arch packages installs and access to packages for users. On the otherhand, it isn’t “just an installer” because it improves the look and flow of all of the DE options giving some a VERY needed polish. (KDE for example is a hideously designed DE, but Antergos made it actually look good by default.)

    So, Antergos suffers from nothing that Manjaro or any of the forks suffer from and when you are done with the install, you essentially have Arch (with some polish).

    Actually, if you install the “Base” option instead of choosing a DE then you have pure Arch with none of the extra polish.

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  • I whole-heartedly agree with both george and michael. That’s the beauty of real rolling releases. Manjaro, imho, isn’t really a pure rolling release.
    So armadillo, you should have no qaulms or issues with respect to how Antergos functions on your machine. The dev team here for Antergos do a fantastic job for keeping Antergos the way it has panned out ([i:2yk68vcu]sure, there’s still some work to do, but not every distro is perfect in the dictionary’s sense of the word’s definition[/i:2yk68vcu]).
    Antergos would never suffer the kind of security issues that Manjaro has. Manjaro might pride themselves with having stable fixes but like your quote states, that stability comes at a cost because it takes quite a while before those fixes are put out for the general use of Manjaro’s users.
    I’d say, go ahead and start using Antergos. The users here on the board haven’t turned their back on it. I sure haven’t either.

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