• Removing stable kernel


    I found the following command in an article about Arch Linux. sudo pacman -Rs linux.

    This will remove the standard kernel and just the LTS kernel will remain.

    The guy didn’t say anything about changing or updating anything else.

  • @debiandonder I think removing the latest current kernel is not the thing to do. I fail to understand why you continue to want to do this? Arch based rolling releases are set up to have the latest current kernel and gives you the option to have the lts kernel installed. Why do want to run on an lts kernel. You would be better off uninstalling the lts kernel if you just don’t want two kernels installed. If you only want to run an lts kernel then Arch based rolling distros aren’t set up that way. There are lots of distros that strictly run lts kernels. I can’t tell you what to do but i think it isn’t in your best interest to do so on this rolling release distro of Antergos.

  • @debiandonder If you look at the man page for pacman in the terminal.

    man pacman

    You will see that the -R is to remove a package and the -Rs tells it to search only packages with descriptions matching ALL of those terms will be returned. So it would remove linux which is the Linux kernel and modules for the currently installed kernel.

    I’m not sure what the ramifications of doing so are but i wouldn’t advise it as i have said. My opinion for what ever it’s worth. 😐

  • i generally have two kernels installed if one fail always try other out, only you can setup in which order it wanna start. if you wanna start lts and you have two you can do like :

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/GRUB/Tips_and_tricks#Changing_the_default_menu_entry

    then always start that kernel…

  • @ringo32 Can you not also use grub customizer to do it also?

  • @ricklinux personal i dislike grub customizer :) have tried in the past, always a mess

    if you edit /etc/default/grub

    and edit GRUB_DEFAULT

    to GRUB_DEFAULT=“1>2” or in words thats kinda dificult to remember, then it takes the second

    but if you have 3 , hemmm i think it becommes 1>4 but im not sure ^^

    linux-lts is always 2nd with 1>2 it select inux-lts always you have also time to select linux if needed

  • @ringo32 I also don’t use grub customizer but for some people it’s just easier maybe? I have edited my grub also for dual boot with Windows 10 so it saves last boot. Only because when Windows has to do an update i don’t want it going into Linux if i’m not right there baby sitting it. One of these days i probably won’t have Windows anymore. I have it only on my newest computer i just built.

  • @ricklinux i think chris titus tech has a tutorial of such windows 10 also to stop the auto update atleast ?

    yeah you can save the default too idd.

  • @ringo32 It’s not really the auto update feature i’m referring to. It’s just the fact that if im in Windows and it updates or i do an update that requires a reboot i want grub to automatically go back into Windows not Antergos. So i set it up this way in grub to save last boot. That way i can just walk away and know it will reboot into windows and i can go get a coffee or something while i wait for Windows instead of twiddling my thumbs. If you know what i mean!

  • ah ok, i never experienced such thing like that i dont have win10 :) only linux :) also no efi, a woman on irc setup her grub on usb :)

  • @ringo32 I’m getting to the point of not really liking Windows anymore. There’s always an issue with what they are doing. They give the same generic answers for almost every single problem and most of it never works.

  • I use it the same way that @ringo32 does. When Win7 wants its bl***y reboot, I can tell it yes, and walk away and find something more productive to do (like watch grass grow!).

  • @ricklinux said in Removing stable kernel:

    You will see that the -R is to remove a package and the -Rs tells it to search only packages with descriptions matching ALL of those terms will be returned.

    Yes, I am still learning Arch commands and saw the sudo pacman -Rs command in the article “7 Essential things to do after installing Arch linux” in It’s FOSS.

    The same command can be found in Pacman/Rosetta

    It just thought that the LTS kernel works fine and might be least likely to cause problems. The stable kernel has updates many times in two weeks and the LTS kernel also but less frequently.

    I guess I can also us the Add/Remove software feature in Antergos to remove the stable kernel and just be left with the LTS kernel.

    I am not sure if my PC will then just boot into the LTS kernel? I might also break the boot loader in the process?

    Manjaro has an easy kernel switcher but Manjaro is too bloated with programs I won’t use. I would rather continue to use Antergos.

  • @ricklinux said in Removing stable kernel:

    Why do want to run on an lts kernel.

    I have used Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for years and have believed that LTS is the way to go if one wants less trouble. I also have old hardware and don’t need all the latest and greatest features.

    I am new to Arch and considered it wise to just use the LTS while learning the ins and outs, but have had no trouble yet with the Stable kernel so far.

    Yes, you are right, as far as I know only Manjaro uses the LTS Linux kernel in their rolling release distro.

  • @grenouille said in Removing stable kernel:

    I use it the same way that @ringo32 does. When Win7 wants its bl***y reboot, I can tell it yes, and walk away and find something more productive to do (like watch grass grow!).

    I had Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Windows 7 for years on my PC. Never used Windows 7 again because I didn’t know how to fix the internet connection.

    This year I just installed Debian 9 based Q40S and wiped Windows away for good. That felt nice.

    One evening Debian 9 froze and I was left with some message about unidentified file system. That’s the only time Linux died on me and fortunately I had Ubuntu on a CD.

    I now keep two Linux dsitro’s on two DVD’s in case the one on my PC gets destroyed again.

    Long story short, for a few people like me, Linux is actually easier to use than Windows.

    Windows rhymes with widows, no pleasant memories for me.

  • @debiandonder As @ringo32 pointed out you could edit grub and have it boot always into the lts kernel instead as first choice rather than having to go into advanced and select it. You would still have both kernels installed but it would always boot into the lts. I would not consider your hardware that old. Again even with Manjaro it has the current kernel and lts but it does have a kernel manager. I use both but i preferred Antergos.

  • @ricklinux I understand. I forgot the mention even the LTS kernel on my Antergos system has been updated twice in the last two weeks. That’s far more frequent than say Ubuntu.

    Manjaro reminds me of Windows, too much stuff I don’t use and the Manjaro Architect install is a bit technical.

    For now I will leave well alone and see how it goes. My have only used Antergos for two weeks now and only know Debian/Ubuntu before that.

    So far, so very good!

  • @ricklinux said in Removing stable kernel:

    @ringo32 I’m getting to the point of not really liking Windows anymore. There’s always an issue with what they are doing. They give the same generic answers for almost every single problem and most of it never works.

    I looked at a new laptop in a PC shop with Windows 10 on it and tried to navigate the menu and just got confused.

    Maybe Linux has changed how my brain works?

  • @debiandonder Yes Linux does that to you. I have come to really not like Windows for many many reasons. Microsoft has tunnel vision. They just don’t get it. As far as i’m concerned Windows is worse than any Linux version. You never know what they are going to change and what problems it’s going to cause. Every fix causes another problem all they’re fixes are the same generic answers that usually do not work. I’m tired of constantly having to reboot to install updates. You think there are too many updates in Linux. I don’t like the reboots in order to install something in Windows. At least in Linux the updates just install in seconds.

  • @ricklinux I am not very technical when it comes to the maintenance of operating systems, so Linux is easier for me.

    I last used Windows in 2014 or something, but as I understand it you get one big update a month for Windows 10 and then you can go on a short holiday.

    Some updates to my Antergos system have been very small and installed fast, it’s just that I though the LTS kernel was save enough to use alone. My LTS kernel has updated twice in two weeks so it also rolls but only slower than the stable Linux kernel.

    I will just consider having two kernels as having a reserve parachute in case the primary one fails.

    The best feature of Antergos has been choosing what you want during the install and just adding a game or so after that.

kernel152 removing17 stable4 Posts 24Views 138
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